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Dietary protein intake in sarcopenic obese older women.
Clin Interv Aging. 2016; 11:133-40.CI

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the prevalence of sarcopenia in a population of obese older women and to assess the effect of a diet moderately rich in proteins on lean mass in sarcopenic obese older women.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A total of 1,030 females, >65 years old, body mass index >30 kg/m(2), were investigated about their nutritional status. Muscle mass (MM) was estimated according to the Janssen equation (MM =0.401× height(2)/resistance measured at 50 kHz +3.825× sex -0.071× age +5.102). Sarcopenia was defined according to the MM index, MM/height2 (kg/m(2)), as two standard deviations lower than the obesity-derived cutoff score (7.3 kg/m(2)). A food-frequency questionnaire was used to measure participants' usual food intake during the previous 3 months. Moreover, a group of sarcopenic obese older women (n=104) was divided in two subgroups: the first (normal protein intake [NPI], n=50) administered with a hypocaloric diet (0.8 g/kg desirable body weight/day of proteins), and the second treated with a hypocaloric diet containing 1.2 g/kg desirable body weight/day of proteins (high protein intake [HPI], n=54), for 3 months. Dietary ingestion was estimated according to a daily food diary, self-administered, and three reports of nonconsecutive 24-hour recall every month during the follow-up.

RESULTS

The 104 women were classified as sarcopenic. After dieting, significant reductions in body mass index were detected (NPI 30.7±1.3 vs 32.0±2.3 kg/m(2), HPI 30.26±0.90 vs 31.05±2.90 kg/m(2); P<0.01 vs baseline). The MM index presented significant variations in the NPI as well as in the HPI sarcopenic group (NPI 6.98±0.1 vs 7.10±0.2 kg/m(2), HPI 7.13±0.4 vs 6.96±0.1 kg/m(2); P<0.01 vs baseline).

CONCLUSION

A diet moderately rich in proteins was able to preserve MM in sarcopenic women. Therefore, adequate protein intake could contribute to the prevention of lean-mass loss associated with weight reduction in obese older people.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy.Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy.Human Nutrition Research Centre, Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy.Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy.IRCCS Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Telese, Italy.Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26917955

Citation

Muscariello, Espedita, et al. "Dietary Protein Intake in Sarcopenic Obese Older Women." Clinical Interventions in Aging, vol. 11, 2016, pp. 133-40.
Muscariello E, Nasti G, Siervo M, et al. Dietary protein intake in sarcopenic obese older women. Clin Interv Aging. 2016;11:133-40.
Muscariello, E., Nasti, G., Siervo, M., Di Maro, M., Lapi, D., D'Addio, G., & Colantuoni, A. (2016). Dietary protein intake in sarcopenic obese older women. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 11, 133-40. https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S96017
Muscariello E, et al. Dietary Protein Intake in Sarcopenic Obese Older Women. Clin Interv Aging. 2016;11:133-40. PubMed PMID: 26917955.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary protein intake in sarcopenic obese older women. AU - Muscariello,Espedita, AU - Nasti,Gilda, AU - Siervo,Mario, AU - Di Maro,Martina, AU - Lapi,Dominga, AU - D'Addio,Gianni, AU - Colantuoni,Antonio, Y1 - 2016/02/05/ PY - 2016/2/27/entrez PY - 2016/2/27/pubmed PY - 2016/9/30/medline KW - aging KW - lean body mass KW - obesity KW - protein intake KW - sarcopenia SP - 133 EP - 40 JF - Clinical interventions in aging JO - Clin Interv Aging VL - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of sarcopenia in a population of obese older women and to assess the effect of a diet moderately rich in proteins on lean mass in sarcopenic obese older women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1,030 females, >65 years old, body mass index >30 kg/m(2), were investigated about their nutritional status. Muscle mass (MM) was estimated according to the Janssen equation (MM =0.401× height(2)/resistance measured at 50 kHz +3.825× sex -0.071× age +5.102). Sarcopenia was defined according to the MM index, MM/height2 (kg/m(2)), as two standard deviations lower than the obesity-derived cutoff score (7.3 kg/m(2)). A food-frequency questionnaire was used to measure participants' usual food intake during the previous 3 months. Moreover, a group of sarcopenic obese older women (n=104) was divided in two subgroups: the first (normal protein intake [NPI], n=50) administered with a hypocaloric diet (0.8 g/kg desirable body weight/day of proteins), and the second treated with a hypocaloric diet containing 1.2 g/kg desirable body weight/day of proteins (high protein intake [HPI], n=54), for 3 months. Dietary ingestion was estimated according to a daily food diary, self-administered, and three reports of nonconsecutive 24-hour recall every month during the follow-up. RESULTS: The 104 women were classified as sarcopenic. After dieting, significant reductions in body mass index were detected (NPI 30.7±1.3 vs 32.0±2.3 kg/m(2), HPI 30.26±0.90 vs 31.05±2.90 kg/m(2); P<0.01 vs baseline). The MM index presented significant variations in the NPI as well as in the HPI sarcopenic group (NPI 6.98±0.1 vs 7.10±0.2 kg/m(2), HPI 7.13±0.4 vs 6.96±0.1 kg/m(2); P<0.01 vs baseline). CONCLUSION: A diet moderately rich in proteins was able to preserve MM in sarcopenic women. Therefore, adequate protein intake could contribute to the prevention of lean-mass loss associated with weight reduction in obese older people. SN - 1178-1998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26917955/Dietary_protein_intake_in_sarcopenic_obese_older_women_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S96017 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -