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Severe Physical Intimate Partner Violence and the Mental and Physical Health of U.S. Caribbean Black Women.
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2016 09; 25(9):920-9.JW

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Intimate partner violence is a threat to women's health. Relative to other racial/ethnic groups, African American and immigrant women are at an increased risk for violence. However, despite the growing presence of Caribbean Black immigrants in this country, few studies have examined the association between severe physical intimate partner violence (SPIPV) and the health of Caribbean Black women currently residing in the United States. This study examined the mental and physical health of U.S. Caribbean Black women with and without a history of SPIPV. We also explored the role of generational status-first, second, or third-in association with the physical and mental health of abused Caribbean Black women.

METHODS

Data from the National Survey of American Life, the largest and the only known representative study on Caribbeans residing in the United States, were analyzed. The World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI) was used to determine DSM-IV mental disorders. The presence of physical health conditions was based on respondents' self-reports of physician diagnoses.

RESULTS

The findings indicate an association between SPIPV and the mental and physical health status of U.S. Caribbean Black women. Rates of physical conditions and mental health disorders were generally higher among women with a history of SPIPV than those without a history. Generational status also played a role in women's health outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

The study has interventions and preventive implications for both detecting and addressing the health needs of U.S. Caribbean Black women who experience severe physical abuse by an intimate partner.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Program for Research on Black Americans, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan , Ann Arbor, Michigan .2 Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey , New Brunswick, New Jersey .

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26918816

Citation

Lacey, Krim K., and Dawne M. Mouzon. "Severe Physical Intimate Partner Violence and the Mental and Physical Health of U.S. Caribbean Black Women." Journal of Women's Health (2002), vol. 25, no. 9, 2016, pp. 920-9.
Lacey KK, Mouzon DM. Severe Physical Intimate Partner Violence and the Mental and Physical Health of U.S. Caribbean Black Women. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2016;25(9):920-9.
Lacey, K. K., & Mouzon, D. M. (2016). Severe Physical Intimate Partner Violence and the Mental and Physical Health of U.S. Caribbean Black Women. Journal of Women's Health (2002), 25(9), 920-9. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2015.5293
Lacey KK, Mouzon DM. Severe Physical Intimate Partner Violence and the Mental and Physical Health of U.S. Caribbean Black Women. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2016;25(9):920-9. PubMed PMID: 26918816.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe Physical Intimate Partner Violence and the Mental and Physical Health of U.S. Caribbean Black Women. AU - Lacey,Krim K, AU - Mouzon,Dawne M, Y1 - 2016/02/26/ PY - 2016/2/27/entrez PY - 2016/2/27/pubmed PY - 2017/10/13/medline SP - 920 EP - 9 JF - Journal of women's health (2002) JO - J Womens Health (Larchmt) VL - 25 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence is a threat to women's health. Relative to other racial/ethnic groups, African American and immigrant women are at an increased risk for violence. However, despite the growing presence of Caribbean Black immigrants in this country, few studies have examined the association between severe physical intimate partner violence (SPIPV) and the health of Caribbean Black women currently residing in the United States. This study examined the mental and physical health of U.S. Caribbean Black women with and without a history of SPIPV. We also explored the role of generational status-first, second, or third-in association with the physical and mental health of abused Caribbean Black women. METHODS: Data from the National Survey of American Life, the largest and the only known representative study on Caribbeans residing in the United States, were analyzed. The World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI) was used to determine DSM-IV mental disorders. The presence of physical health conditions was based on respondents' self-reports of physician diagnoses. RESULTS: The findings indicate an association between SPIPV and the mental and physical health status of U.S. Caribbean Black women. Rates of physical conditions and mental health disorders were generally higher among women with a history of SPIPV than those without a history. Generational status also played a role in women's health outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The study has interventions and preventive implications for both detecting and addressing the health needs of U.S. Caribbean Black women who experience severe physical abuse by an intimate partner. SN - 1931-843X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26918816/Severe_Physical_Intimate_Partner_Violence_and_the_Mental_and_Physical_Health_of_U_S__Caribbean_Black_Women_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/jwh.2015.5293?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -