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Coexistence of multiple coronaviruses in several bat colonies in an abandoned mineshaft.
Virol Sin. 2016 Feb; 31(1):31-40.VS

Abstract

Since the 2002-2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak prompted a search for the natural reservoir of the SARS coronavirus, numerous alpha- and betacoronaviruses have been discovered in bats around the world. Bats are likely the natural reservoir of alpha- and betacoronaviruses, and due to the rich diversity and global distribution of bats, the number of bat coronaviruses will likely increase. We conducted a surveillance of coronaviruses in bats in an abandoned mineshaft in Mojiang County, Yunnan Province, China, from 2012-2013. Six bat species were frequently detected in the cave: Rhinolophus sinicus, Rhinolophus affinis, Hipposideros pomona, Miniopterus schreibersii, Miniopterus fuliginosus, and Miniopterus fuscus. By sequencing PCR products of the coronavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene (RdRp), we found a high frequency of infection by a diverse group of coronaviruses in different bat species in the mineshaft. Sequenced partial RdRp fragments had 80%-99% nucleic acid sequence identity with well-characterized Alphacoronavirus species, including BtCoV HKU2, BtCoV HKU8, and BtCoV1, and unassigned species BtCoV HKU7 and BtCoV HKU10. Additionally, the surveillance identified two unclassified betacoronaviruses, one new strain of SARS-like coronavirus, and one potentially new betacoronavirus species. Furthermore, coronavirus co-infection was detected in all six bat species, a phenomenon that fosters recombination and promotes the emergence of novel virus strains. Our findings highlight the importance of bats as natural reservoirs of coronaviruses and the potentially zoonotic source of viral pathogens.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071, China.Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071, China.Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071, China.Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071, China.Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071, China.Yunnan Provincial Key Laboratory for Zoonosis Control and Prevention, Yunnan Institute of Endemic Diseases Control and Prevention, Dali, 671000, China. School of Public Health, Dali University, Dali, 671000, China.Yunnan Provincial Key Laboratory for Zoonosis Control and Prevention, Yunnan Institute of Endemic Diseases Control and Prevention, Dali, 671000, China.Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071, China.Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071, China.Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071, China.Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071, China.Mojiang Center for Diseases Control and Prevention, Mojiang, 654800, China.Mojiang Center for Diseases Control and Prevention, Mojiang, 654800, China.Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071, China. zlshi@wh.iov.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26920708

Citation

Ge, Xing-Yi, et al. "Coexistence of Multiple Coronaviruses in Several Bat Colonies in an Abandoned Mineshaft." Virologica Sinica, vol. 31, no. 1, 2016, pp. 31-40.
Ge XY, Wang N, Zhang W, et al. Coexistence of multiple coronaviruses in several bat colonies in an abandoned mineshaft. Virol Sin. 2016;31(1):31-40.
Ge, X. Y., Wang, N., Zhang, W., Hu, B., Li, B., Zhang, Y. Z., Zhou, J. H., Luo, C. M., Yang, X. L., Wu, L. J., Wang, B., Zhang, Y., Li, Z. X., & Shi, Z. L. (2016). Coexistence of multiple coronaviruses in several bat colonies in an abandoned mineshaft. Virologica Sinica, 31(1), 31-40. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12250-016-3713-9
Ge XY, et al. Coexistence of Multiple Coronaviruses in Several Bat Colonies in an Abandoned Mineshaft. Virol Sin. 2016;31(1):31-40. PubMed PMID: 26920708.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coexistence of multiple coronaviruses in several bat colonies in an abandoned mineshaft. AU - Ge,Xing-Yi, AU - Wang,Ning, AU - Zhang,Wei, AU - Hu,Ben, AU - Li,Bei, AU - Zhang,Yun-Zhi, AU - Zhou,Ji-Hua, AU - Luo,Chu-Ming, AU - Yang,Xing-Lou, AU - Wu,Li-Jun, AU - Wang,Bo, AU - Zhang,Yun, AU - Li,Zong-Xiao, AU - Shi,Zheng-Li, Y1 - 2016/02/18/ PY - 2016/01/01/received PY - 2016/01/22/accepted PY - 2016/2/28/entrez PY - 2016/2/28/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - bat KW - coinfection KW - coronavirus KW - mineshaft SP - 31 EP - 40 JF - Virologica Sinica JO - Virol Sin VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - Since the 2002-2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak prompted a search for the natural reservoir of the SARS coronavirus, numerous alpha- and betacoronaviruses have been discovered in bats around the world. Bats are likely the natural reservoir of alpha- and betacoronaviruses, and due to the rich diversity and global distribution of bats, the number of bat coronaviruses will likely increase. We conducted a surveillance of coronaviruses in bats in an abandoned mineshaft in Mojiang County, Yunnan Province, China, from 2012-2013. Six bat species were frequently detected in the cave: Rhinolophus sinicus, Rhinolophus affinis, Hipposideros pomona, Miniopterus schreibersii, Miniopterus fuliginosus, and Miniopterus fuscus. By sequencing PCR products of the coronavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene (RdRp), we found a high frequency of infection by a diverse group of coronaviruses in different bat species in the mineshaft. Sequenced partial RdRp fragments had 80%-99% nucleic acid sequence identity with well-characterized Alphacoronavirus species, including BtCoV HKU2, BtCoV HKU8, and BtCoV1, and unassigned species BtCoV HKU7 and BtCoV HKU10. Additionally, the surveillance identified two unclassified betacoronaviruses, one new strain of SARS-like coronavirus, and one potentially new betacoronavirus species. Furthermore, coronavirus co-infection was detected in all six bat species, a phenomenon that fosters recombination and promotes the emergence of novel virus strains. Our findings highlight the importance of bats as natural reservoirs of coronaviruses and the potentially zoonotic source of viral pathogens. SN - 1995-820X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26920708/Coexistence_of_multiple_coronaviruses_in_several_bat_colonies_in_an_abandoned_mineshaft_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12250-016-3713-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -