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Influence of Degree-of-Polymerization and Linkage on the Quantification of Proanthocyanidins using 4-Dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC) Assay.
J Agric Food Chem 2016; 64(11):2190-9JA

Abstract

Proanthocyanidins (PACs) are naturally occurring flavonoids possessing health beneficial bioactivities. Their quantification often utilizes the 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC) spectrophotometric assay with the assumption that molar absorption coefficients (MACs) are similar across the various PAC species. To assess the validity of this assumption, individual PAC monomers and oligomers were examined for their absorbance response with DMAC. Our results have shown that PAC dimers and trimers with interflavan linkage variations exhibited differential absorbance response. Absence of A-type linkage between the terminal and second units in PAC molecule not only impacts absorbance intensity at 640 nm but also elicits a prominent secondary 440 nm absorbance peak. Cranberry (A-type) and cocoa (B-type) oligomeric PACs exhibited differential absorbance (MACs) relationship with degree-of-polymerization. Thus, PAC structural variations have considerable impact on the resulting MAC. The use of DMAC assay in PAC quantification, especially in comparing across specific oligomers and compositions, should not assume MACs are similar.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plant Biology and Pathology, Rutgers University , New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, United States.Department of Plant Biology and Pathology, Rutgers University , New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, United States.Hershey Center of Health and Nutrition, The Hershey Company , Hershey, Pennsylvania United States.Planta Analytica, LLC. , Danbury, Connecticut 17033, United States.Department of Orthodontics and Divisions of Pediatric Dentistry & Community Oral Health, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States.Department of Plant Biology and Pathology, Rutgers University , New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, United States. Philip E. Marucci Center for Blueberry and Cranberry Research and Extension, Rutgers University , Chatsworth, New Jersey 08019, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26923226

Citation

Wang, Yifei, et al. "Influence of Degree-of-Polymerization and Linkage On the Quantification of Proanthocyanidins Using 4-Dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC) Assay." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 64, no. 11, 2016, pp. 2190-9.
Wang Y, Singh AP, Hurst WJ, et al. Influence of Degree-of-Polymerization and Linkage on the Quantification of Proanthocyanidins using 4-Dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC) Assay. J Agric Food Chem. 2016;64(11):2190-9.
Wang, Y., Singh, A. P., Hurst, W. J., Glinski, J. A., Koo, H., & Vorsa, N. (2016). Influence of Degree-of-Polymerization and Linkage on the Quantification of Proanthocyanidins using 4-Dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC) Assay. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 64(11), pp. 2190-9. doi:10.1021/acs.jafc.5b05408.
Wang Y, et al. Influence of Degree-of-Polymerization and Linkage On the Quantification of Proanthocyanidins Using 4-Dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC) Assay. J Agric Food Chem. 2016 Mar 23;64(11):2190-9. PubMed PMID: 26923226.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of Degree-of-Polymerization and Linkage on the Quantification of Proanthocyanidins using 4-Dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC) Assay. AU - Wang,Yifei, AU - Singh,Ajay P, AU - Hurst,William J, AU - Glinski,Jan A, AU - Koo,Hyun, AU - Vorsa,Nicholi, Y1 - 2016/03/09/ PY - 2016/3/1/entrez PY - 2016/3/1/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde KW - DMAC KW - proanthocyanidin KW - procyanidin KW - spectrophotometry SP - 2190 EP - 9 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J. Agric. Food Chem. VL - 64 IS - 11 N2 - Proanthocyanidins (PACs) are naturally occurring flavonoids possessing health beneficial bioactivities. Their quantification often utilizes the 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC) spectrophotometric assay with the assumption that molar absorption coefficients (MACs) are similar across the various PAC species. To assess the validity of this assumption, individual PAC monomers and oligomers were examined for their absorbance response with DMAC. Our results have shown that PAC dimers and trimers with interflavan linkage variations exhibited differential absorbance response. Absence of A-type linkage between the terminal and second units in PAC molecule not only impacts absorbance intensity at 640 nm but also elicits a prominent secondary 440 nm absorbance peak. Cranberry (A-type) and cocoa (B-type) oligomeric PACs exhibited differential absorbance (MACs) relationship with degree-of-polymerization. Thus, PAC structural variations have considerable impact on the resulting MAC. The use of DMAC assay in PAC quantification, especially in comparing across specific oligomers and compositions, should not assume MACs are similar. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26923226/Influence_of_Degree_of_Polymerization_and_Linkage_on_the_Quantification_of_Proanthocyanidins_using_4_Dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde__DMAC__Assay_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.5b05408 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -