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Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): animal to human interaction.
Pathog Glob Health. 2015; 109(8):354-62.PG

Abstract

The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel enzootic betacoronavirus that was first described in September 2012. The clinical spectrum of MERS-CoV infection in humans ranges from an asymptomatic or mild respiratory illness to severe pneumonia and multi-organ failure; overall mortality is around 35.7%. Bats harbour several betacoronaviruses that are closely related to MERS-CoV but more research is needed to establish the relationship between bats and MERS-CoV. The seroprevalence of MERS-CoV antibodies is very high in dromedary camels in Eastern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. MERS-CoV RNA and viable virus have been isolated from dromedary camels, including some with respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, near-identical strains of MERS-CoV have been isolated from epidemiologically linked humans and camels, confirming inter-transmission, most probably from camels to humans. Though inter-human spread within health care settings is responsible for the majority of reported MERS-CoV cases, the virus is incapable at present of causing sustained human-to-human transmission. Clusters can be readily controlled with implementation of appropriate infection control procedures. Phylogenetic and sequencing data strongly suggest that MERS-CoV originated from bat ancestors after undergoing a recombination event in the spike protein, possibly in dromedary camels in Africa, before its exportation to the Arabian Peninsula along the camel trading routes. MERS-CoV serosurveys are needed to investigate possible unrecognized human infections in Africa. Amongst the important measures to control MERS-CoV spread are strict regulation of camel movement, regular herd screening and isolation of infected camels, use of personal protective equipment by camel handlers and enforcing rules banning all consumption of unpasteurized camel milk and urine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre , Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26924345

Citation

Omrani, Ali S., et al. "Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV): Animal to Human Interaction." Pathogens and Global Health, vol. 109, no. 8, 2015, pp. 354-62.
Omrani AS, Al-Tawfiq JA, Memish ZA. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): animal to human interaction. Pathog Glob Health. 2015;109(8):354-62.
Omrani, A. S., Al-Tawfiq, J. A., & Memish, Z. A. (2015). Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): animal to human interaction. Pathogens and Global Health, 109(8), 354-62. https://doi.org/10.1080/20477724.2015.1122852
Omrani AS, Al-Tawfiq JA, Memish ZA. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV): Animal to Human Interaction. Pathog Glob Health. 2015;109(8):354-62. PubMed PMID: 26924345.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): animal to human interaction. AU - Omrani,Ali S, AU - Al-Tawfiq,Jaffar A, AU - Memish,Ziad A, PY - 2016/3/1/entrez PY - 2016/3/1/pubmed PY - 2016/11/1/medline KW - Animal KW - Bat KW - Camel KW - Coronavirus KW - Dromedary KW - MERS-CoV KW - Middle East KW - Zoonosis SP - 354 EP - 62 JF - Pathogens and global health JO - Pathog Glob Health VL - 109 IS - 8 N2 - The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel enzootic betacoronavirus that was first described in September 2012. The clinical spectrum of MERS-CoV infection in humans ranges from an asymptomatic or mild respiratory illness to severe pneumonia and multi-organ failure; overall mortality is around 35.7%. Bats harbour several betacoronaviruses that are closely related to MERS-CoV but more research is needed to establish the relationship between bats and MERS-CoV. The seroprevalence of MERS-CoV antibodies is very high in dromedary camels in Eastern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. MERS-CoV RNA and viable virus have been isolated from dromedary camels, including some with respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, near-identical strains of MERS-CoV have been isolated from epidemiologically linked humans and camels, confirming inter-transmission, most probably from camels to humans. Though inter-human spread within health care settings is responsible for the majority of reported MERS-CoV cases, the virus is incapable at present of causing sustained human-to-human transmission. Clusters can be readily controlled with implementation of appropriate infection control procedures. Phylogenetic and sequencing data strongly suggest that MERS-CoV originated from bat ancestors after undergoing a recombination event in the spike protein, possibly in dromedary camels in Africa, before its exportation to the Arabian Peninsula along the camel trading routes. MERS-CoV serosurveys are needed to investigate possible unrecognized human infections in Africa. Amongst the important measures to control MERS-CoV spread are strict regulation of camel movement, regular herd screening and isolation of infected camels, use of personal protective equipment by camel handlers and enforcing rules banning all consumption of unpasteurized camel milk and urine. SN - 2047-7732 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26924345/Middle_East_respiratory_syndrome_coronavirus__MERS_CoV_:_animal_to_human_interaction_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/20477724.2015.1122852 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -