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Dietary sugar intake increases liver tumor incidence in female mice.
Sci Rep 2016; 6:22292SR

Abstract

Overnutrition can promote liver cancer in mice and humans that have liver damage caused by alcohol, viruses, or carcinogens. However, the mechanism linking diet to increased liver tumorigenesis remains unclear in the context of whether tumorigenesis is secondary to obesity, or whether nutrients like sugar or fat drive tumorigenesis independent of obesity. In male mice, liver tumor burden was recently found to correlate with sugar intake, independent of dietary fat intake and obesity. However, females are less susceptible to developing liver cancer than males, and it remains unclear how nutrition affects tumorigenesis in females. Herein, female mice were exposed to the liver carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and fed diets with well-defined sugar and fat content. Mice fed diets with high sugar content had the greatest liver tumor incidence while dietary fat intake was not associated with tumorigenesis. Diet-induced postprandial hyperglycemia and fasting hyperinsulinemia significantly correlated with tumor incidence, while tumor incidence was not associated with obesity and obesity-related disorders including liver steatosis, glucose intolerance, or elevated serum levels of estrogen, ALT, and lipids. These results simplify the pathophysiology of diet-induced liver tumorigenesis by focusing attention on the role of sugar metabolism and reducing emphasis on the complex milieu associated with obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. Emily Couric Clinical Cancer Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. Emily Couric Clinical Cancer Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26924712

Citation

Healy, Marin E., et al. "Dietary Sugar Intake Increases Liver Tumor Incidence in Female Mice." Scientific Reports, vol. 6, 2016, p. 22292.
Healy ME, Lahiri S, Hargett SR, et al. Dietary sugar intake increases liver tumor incidence in female mice. Sci Rep. 2016;6:22292.
Healy, M. E., Lahiri, S., Hargett, S. R., Chow, J. D., Byrne, F. L., Breen, D. S., ... Hoehn, K. L. (2016). Dietary sugar intake increases liver tumor incidence in female mice. Scientific Reports, 6, p. 22292. doi:10.1038/srep22292.
Healy ME, et al. Dietary Sugar Intake Increases Liver Tumor Incidence in Female Mice. Sci Rep. 2016 Feb 29;6:22292. PubMed PMID: 26924712.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary sugar intake increases liver tumor incidence in female mice. AU - Healy,Marin E, AU - Lahiri,Sujoy, AU - Hargett,Stefan R, AU - Chow,Jenny D Y, AU - Byrne,Frances L, AU - Breen,David S, AU - Kenwood,Brandon M, AU - Taddeo,Evan P, AU - Lackner,Carolin, AU - Caldwell,Stephen H, AU - Hoehn,Kyle L, Y1 - 2016/02/29/ PY - 2015/09/30/received PY - 2016/02/11/accepted PY - 2016/3/1/entrez PY - 2016/3/1/pubmed PY - 2016/12/27/medline SP - 22292 EP - 22292 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 6 N2 - Overnutrition can promote liver cancer in mice and humans that have liver damage caused by alcohol, viruses, or carcinogens. However, the mechanism linking diet to increased liver tumorigenesis remains unclear in the context of whether tumorigenesis is secondary to obesity, or whether nutrients like sugar or fat drive tumorigenesis independent of obesity. In male mice, liver tumor burden was recently found to correlate with sugar intake, independent of dietary fat intake and obesity. However, females are less susceptible to developing liver cancer than males, and it remains unclear how nutrition affects tumorigenesis in females. Herein, female mice were exposed to the liver carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and fed diets with well-defined sugar and fat content. Mice fed diets with high sugar content had the greatest liver tumor incidence while dietary fat intake was not associated with tumorigenesis. Diet-induced postprandial hyperglycemia and fasting hyperinsulinemia significantly correlated with tumor incidence, while tumor incidence was not associated with obesity and obesity-related disorders including liver steatosis, glucose intolerance, or elevated serum levels of estrogen, ALT, and lipids. These results simplify the pathophysiology of diet-induced liver tumorigenesis by focusing attention on the role of sugar metabolism and reducing emphasis on the complex milieu associated with obesity. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26924712/Dietary_sugar_intake_increases_liver_tumor_incidence_in_female_mice_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep22292 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -