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Metabolic Syndrome and the Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Progression to Dementia: Follow-up of the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study Cohort.
JAMA Neurol. 2016 Apr; 73(4):456-63.JN

Abstract

IMPORTANCE

The association of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and component cardiovascular risk factors with the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and MCI progression to dementia is not well established.

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the association of the MetS and its component cardiovascular risk factors with the incidence of MCI and its progression to dementia.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

Prospective longitudinal study from September 1, 2003, through December 31, 2009, in communities in 5 districts in the South East region of Singapore. Study participants were a population-based sample of 1519 cognitively normal adults 55 years and older.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES

Prespecified outcomes were incident MCI and MCI progression to dementia.

RESULTS

The study cohort comprised 1519 participants. Their mean (SD) age was 64.9 (6.8) years, and 64.8% (n = 984) were female. Baseline characteristics associated with an increased risk of incident MCI were MetS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.46; 95% CI, 1.02-2.09), central obesity (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.01-1.98), diabetes mellitus (HR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.92-4.19), dyslipidemia (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.01-2.15), and 3 or more component cardiovascular risk factors (HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.13-2.33). Baseline characteristics associated with an increased risk of MCI progression to dementia were MetS (HR, 4.25; 95% CI, 1.29-14.00), diabetes mellitus (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.92-4.19), and 3 or more component cardiovascular risk factors (HR, 4.92; 95% CI, 1.39-17.4).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE

The MetS was associated with an increased incidence of MCI and progression to dementia. Identifying individuals with diabetes mellitus or the MetS with or without MCI is a promising approach in early interventions to prevent or slow progression to dementia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gerontological Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.Gerontological Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.Gerontological Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.Gerontological Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.Gerontological Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.Gerontological Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore, Singapore.Department of Geriatric Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore.Department of Geriatric Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore.Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore.Department of Geriatric Medicine, Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore.Department of Geriatric Medicine, Alexandra Hospital, Singapore.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26926205

Citation

Ng, Tze Pin, et al. "Metabolic Syndrome and the Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Progression to Dementia: Follow-up of the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study Cohort." JAMA Neurology, vol. 73, no. 4, 2016, pp. 456-63.
Ng TP, Feng L, Nyunt MS, et al. Metabolic Syndrome and the Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Progression to Dementia: Follow-up of the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study Cohort. JAMA Neurol. 2016;73(4):456-63.
Ng, T. P., Feng, L., Nyunt, M. S., Feng, L., Gao, Q., Lim, M. L., Collinson, S. L., Chong, M. S., Lim, W. S., Lee, T. S., Yap, P., & Yap, K. B. (2016). Metabolic Syndrome and the Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Progression to Dementia: Follow-up of the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study Cohort. JAMA Neurology, 73(4), 456-63. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2015.4899
Ng TP, et al. Metabolic Syndrome and the Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Progression to Dementia: Follow-up of the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study Cohort. JAMA Neurol. 2016;73(4):456-63. PubMed PMID: 26926205.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic Syndrome and the Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Progression to Dementia: Follow-up of the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study Cohort. AU - Ng,Tze Pin, AU - Feng,Liang, AU - Nyunt,Ma Shwe Zin, AU - Feng,Lei, AU - Gao,Qi, AU - Lim,May Li, AU - Collinson,Simon L, AU - Chong,Mei Sian, AU - Lim,Wee Shiong, AU - Lee,Tih Shih, AU - Yap,Philip, AU - Yap,Keng Bee, PY - 2016/3/2/entrez PY - 2016/3/2/pubmed PY - 2016/9/13/medline SP - 456 EP - 63 JF - JAMA neurology JO - JAMA Neurol VL - 73 IS - 4 N2 - IMPORTANCE: The association of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and component cardiovascular risk factors with the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and MCI progression to dementia is not well established. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of the MetS and its component cardiovascular risk factors with the incidence of MCI and its progression to dementia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective longitudinal study from September 1, 2003, through December 31, 2009, in communities in 5 districts in the South East region of Singapore. Study participants were a population-based sample of 1519 cognitively normal adults 55 years and older. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Prespecified outcomes were incident MCI and MCI progression to dementia. RESULTS: The study cohort comprised 1519 participants. Their mean (SD) age was 64.9 (6.8) years, and 64.8% (n = 984) were female. Baseline characteristics associated with an increased risk of incident MCI were MetS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.46; 95% CI, 1.02-2.09), central obesity (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.01-1.98), diabetes mellitus (HR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.92-4.19), dyslipidemia (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.01-2.15), and 3 or more component cardiovascular risk factors (HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.13-2.33). Baseline characteristics associated with an increased risk of MCI progression to dementia were MetS (HR, 4.25; 95% CI, 1.29-14.00), diabetes mellitus (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.92-4.19), and 3 or more component cardiovascular risk factors (HR, 4.92; 95% CI, 1.39-17.4). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: The MetS was associated with an increased incidence of MCI and progression to dementia. Identifying individuals with diabetes mellitus or the MetS with or without MCI is a promising approach in early interventions to prevent or slow progression to dementia. SN - 2168-6157 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26926205/Metabolic_Syndrome_and_the_Risk_of_Mild_Cognitive_Impairment_and_Progression_to_Dementia:_Follow_up_of_the_Singapore_Longitudinal_Ageing_Study_Cohort_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaneurol.2015.4899 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -