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Acculturation Strategies Among South Asian Immigrants: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study.
J Immigr Minor Health. 2017 04; 19(2):373-380.JI

Abstract

In the past, epidemiologic research on acculturation and health has been criticized for its conceptual ambiguity and simplistic measurement approaches. This study applied a widely-used theoretical framework from cross-cultural psychology to identify acculturation strategies among South Asian immigrants in the US and to examine sociodemographic correlates of acculturation strategies. Data were from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America study. We used latent class analysis to identify groups of individuals that were similar based on cultural attitudes and behaviors. We used latent class regression analysis to examine sociodemographic correlates of acculturation strategies. We found that South Asian immigrants employed three acculturation strategies, including separation (characterized by a relatively high degree of preference for South Asian culture over US culture), assimilation (characterized by a relatively high degree of preference for US culture over South Asian culture), and integration (characterized by a similar level of preference for South Asian and US cultures). Respondents with no religious affiliation, those with higher levels of income, those who lived a greater percentage of their lives in the US, and those who spoke English well or very well were less likely to use the separation strategy than the assimilation or integration strategies. Using epidemiologic cohort data, this study illustrated a conceptual and methodological approach that addresses limitations of previous research on acculturation and health. More work is needed to understand how the acculturation strategies identified in this study affect the health of South Asian immigrants in the US.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, 2649A SPH Tower, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2029, USA. needhamb@umich.edu.Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Department of Statistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Departments of Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Department of Health Science, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA, USA.Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26928020

Citation

Needham, Belinda L., et al. "Acculturation Strategies Among South Asian Immigrants: the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study." Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, vol. 19, no. 2, 2017, pp. 373-380.
Needham BL, Mukherjee B, Bagchi P, et al. Acculturation Strategies Among South Asian Immigrants: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. J Immigr Minor Health. 2017;19(2):373-380.
Needham, B. L., Mukherjee, B., Bagchi, P., Kim, C., Mukherjea, A., Kandula, N. R., & Kanaya, A. M. (2017). Acculturation Strategies Among South Asian Immigrants: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 19(2), 373-380. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10903-016-0372-8
Needham BL, et al. Acculturation Strategies Among South Asian Immigrants: the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. J Immigr Minor Health. 2017;19(2):373-380. PubMed PMID: 26928020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acculturation Strategies Among South Asian Immigrants: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. AU - Needham,Belinda L, AU - Mukherjee,Bhramar, AU - Bagchi,Pramita, AU - Kim,Catherine, AU - Mukherjea,Arnab, AU - Kandula,Namratha R, AU - Kanaya,Alka M, PY - 2016/3/2/pubmed PY - 2018/1/6/medline PY - 2016/3/2/entrez KW - Acculturation KW - Latent class analysis KW - South Asian immigrants KW - US SP - 373 EP - 380 JF - Journal of immigrant and minority health JO - J Immigr Minor Health VL - 19 IS - 2 N2 - In the past, epidemiologic research on acculturation and health has been criticized for its conceptual ambiguity and simplistic measurement approaches. This study applied a widely-used theoretical framework from cross-cultural psychology to identify acculturation strategies among South Asian immigrants in the US and to examine sociodemographic correlates of acculturation strategies. Data were from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America study. We used latent class analysis to identify groups of individuals that were similar based on cultural attitudes and behaviors. We used latent class regression analysis to examine sociodemographic correlates of acculturation strategies. We found that South Asian immigrants employed three acculturation strategies, including separation (characterized by a relatively high degree of preference for South Asian culture over US culture), assimilation (characterized by a relatively high degree of preference for US culture over South Asian culture), and integration (characterized by a similar level of preference for South Asian and US cultures). Respondents with no religious affiliation, those with higher levels of income, those who lived a greater percentage of their lives in the US, and those who spoke English well or very well were less likely to use the separation strategy than the assimilation or integration strategies. Using epidemiologic cohort data, this study illustrated a conceptual and methodological approach that addresses limitations of previous research on acculturation and health. More work is needed to understand how the acculturation strategies identified in this study affect the health of South Asian immigrants in the US. SN - 1557-1920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26928020/Acculturation_Strategies_Among_South_Asian_Immigrants:_The_Mediators_of_Atherosclerosis_in_South_Asians_Living_in_America__MASALA__Study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10903-016-0372-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -