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Amebic Liver Abscess in Israeli Travelers: A Retrospective Study.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2016 May 04; 94(5):1015-9.AJ

Abstract

Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is endemic in developing countries. The epidemiology and clinical characteristics of the disease in developing countries are well described. Travelers from nonendemic countries can serve as a model for the natural history of ALA. Currently, the available literature on travelers is limited. This is a retrospective observational study on Israeli travelers diagnosed with ALA. Data regarding travel history, clinical presentation, imaging, and treatment were collected and analyzed. Among 6,867 ill returning Israeli travelers, amebiasis was diagnosed in 53 travelers (0.77%), of whom 14 were with ALA (0.2%). Twelve ALA cases (86%) had an exposure in the Indian subcontinent. The male to female ratio was 1:1, with no significant clinical differences between the sexes. The average lag period between exposure and onset of symptoms was 17.1 months. The lack of male predominance and the prolonged lag period may imply that behavioral factors are pivotal in the development of ALA. Larger case series of travelers are required.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Infectious Diseases Unit, Shaare-Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Infectious Diseases Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; The Center for Geographic Medicine, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.Infectious Diseases Unit, Shaare-Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Infectious Diseases Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; The Center for Geographic Medicine, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.Infectious Diseases Unit, Shaare-Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Infectious Diseases Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; The Center for Geographic Medicine, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel elischwa@post.tau.ac.il.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26928829

Citation

Lachish, Tamar, et al. "Amebic Liver Abscess in Israeli Travelers: a Retrospective Study." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 94, no. 5, 2016, pp. 1015-9.
Lachish T, Wieder-Finesod A, Schwartz E. Amebic Liver Abscess in Israeli Travelers: A Retrospective Study. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2016;94(5):1015-9.
Lachish, T., Wieder-Finesod, A., & Schwartz, E. (2016). Amebic Liver Abscess in Israeli Travelers: A Retrospective Study. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 94(5), 1015-9. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0576
Lachish T, Wieder-Finesod A, Schwartz E. Amebic Liver Abscess in Israeli Travelers: a Retrospective Study. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2016 May 4;94(5):1015-9. PubMed PMID: 26928829.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Amebic Liver Abscess in Israeli Travelers: A Retrospective Study. AU - Lachish,Tamar, AU - Wieder-Finesod,Anat, AU - Schwartz,Eli, Y1 - 2016/02/29/ PY - 2015/08/08/received PY - 2015/12/14/accepted PY - 2016/3/2/entrez PY - 2016/3/2/pubmed PY - 2017/5/10/medline SP - 1015 EP - 9 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 94 IS - 5 N2 - Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is endemic in developing countries. The epidemiology and clinical characteristics of the disease in developing countries are well described. Travelers from nonendemic countries can serve as a model for the natural history of ALA. Currently, the available literature on travelers is limited. This is a retrospective observational study on Israeli travelers diagnosed with ALA. Data regarding travel history, clinical presentation, imaging, and treatment were collected and analyzed. Among 6,867 ill returning Israeli travelers, amebiasis was diagnosed in 53 travelers (0.77%), of whom 14 were with ALA (0.2%). Twelve ALA cases (86%) had an exposure in the Indian subcontinent. The male to female ratio was 1:1, with no significant clinical differences between the sexes. The average lag period between exposure and onset of symptoms was 17.1 months. The lack of male predominance and the prolonged lag period may imply that behavioral factors are pivotal in the development of ALA. Larger case series of travelers are required. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26928829/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0576?crawler=true&mimetype=application/pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -