Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Medial frontal negativity reflects advantageous inequality aversion of proposers in the ultimatum game: An ERP study.
Brain Res. 2016 05 15; 1639:38-46.BR

Abstract

Inequality aversion is a typical form of fairness preferences, which can explain the behaviors in many social exchange situations such as the ultimatum game (UG). There are two kinds of inequality aversion-disadvantageous inequality aversion of responders and advantageous inequality aversion of proposers in the ultimatum game. Although neuroscience research has reported neural correlates of disadvantageous inequality aversion, there are still debates about advantageous inequality aversion of proposers. In this paper, we developed a variant of ultimatum game in which participants played the UG as proposers. On each trial, first, the offer was randomly presented, then, participants as proposers decided whether to choose this offer; next, responders decided whether to accept or not. Offers that responders got 1-20% of the pie are defined as advantageous unfair offers of proposers, whereas offers that responders got 31-50% are defined as fair offers. Event-related brain potentials recorded from the participants showed that more negative-going medial frontal negativity (MFN) was elicited by advantageous unfair offers compared to fair offers in the early time window (250-350ms), which suggested that proposers were averse to advantageous inequality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neural Decision Science Laboratory, Weifang University, Weifang, PR China; Selten Laboratory, Nankai University, Tianjin, PR China. Electronic address: grongw@126.com.Selten Laboratory, Nankai University, Tianjin, PR China.Selten Laboratory, Nankai University, Tianjin, PR China.Department of Economics, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.Neural Decision Science Laboratory, Weifang University, Weifang, PR China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26930614

Citation

Wang, Guangrong, et al. "Medial Frontal Negativity Reflects Advantageous Inequality Aversion of Proposers in the Ultimatum Game: an ERP Study." Brain Research, vol. 1639, 2016, pp. 38-46.
Wang G, Li J, Li Z, et al. Medial frontal negativity reflects advantageous inequality aversion of proposers in the ultimatum game: An ERP study. Brain Res. 2016;1639:38-46.
Wang, G., Li, J., Li, Z., Wei, M., & Li, S. (2016). Medial frontal negativity reflects advantageous inequality aversion of proposers in the ultimatum game: An ERP study. Brain Research, 1639, 38-46. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2016.02.040
Wang G, et al. Medial Frontal Negativity Reflects Advantageous Inequality Aversion of Proposers in the Ultimatum Game: an ERP Study. Brain Res. 2016 05 15;1639:38-46. PubMed PMID: 26930614.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medial frontal negativity reflects advantageous inequality aversion of proposers in the ultimatum game: An ERP study. AU - Wang,Guangrong, AU - Li,Jianbiao, AU - Li,Zheng, AU - Wei,Mengxing, AU - Li,Shaodong, Y1 - 2016/02/27/ PY - 2015/10/24/received PY - 2016/01/18/revised PY - 2016/02/22/accepted PY - 2016/3/2/entrez PY - 2016/3/2/pubmed PY - 2017/7/5/medline KW - Advantageous inequality aversion KW - Decision KW - ERP KW - MFN KW - Ultimatum game SP - 38 EP - 46 JF - Brain research JO - Brain Res VL - 1639 N2 - Inequality aversion is a typical form of fairness preferences, which can explain the behaviors in many social exchange situations such as the ultimatum game (UG). There are two kinds of inequality aversion-disadvantageous inequality aversion of responders and advantageous inequality aversion of proposers in the ultimatum game. Although neuroscience research has reported neural correlates of disadvantageous inequality aversion, there are still debates about advantageous inequality aversion of proposers. In this paper, we developed a variant of ultimatum game in which participants played the UG as proposers. On each trial, first, the offer was randomly presented, then, participants as proposers decided whether to choose this offer; next, responders decided whether to accept or not. Offers that responders got 1-20% of the pie are defined as advantageous unfair offers of proposers, whereas offers that responders got 31-50% are defined as fair offers. Event-related brain potentials recorded from the participants showed that more negative-going medial frontal negativity (MFN) was elicited by advantageous unfair offers compared to fair offers in the early time window (250-350ms), which suggested that proposers were averse to advantageous inequality. SN - 1872-6240 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26930614/Medial_frontal_negativity_reflects_advantageous_inequality_aversion_of_proposers_in_the_ultimatum_game:_An_ERP_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006-8993(16)30099-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -