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Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
World J Gastroenterol. 2016 Feb 28; 22(8):2592-600.WJ

Abstract

AIM

To determine whether Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection confers a higher risk of Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

METHODS

Healthy people who underwent health screening were analyzed retrospectively. Inclusion criteria were age ≥ 20 years, history of H. pylori infection, and recorded insulin level. Participants were classified as H. pylori positive or negative according to (13)C urea breath tests. NAFLD was defined using the hepatic steatosis index (HSI) and NAFLD liver fat score (NAFLD-LFS). Those with an HSI > 36 or NAFLD-LFS > -0.640 were considered to have NAFLD. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors for NAFLD.

RESULTS

Three thousand six hundred and sixty-three people were analyzed and 1636 (44.7%) were H. pylori positive. H. pylori infection was associated with older age, male gender, hypertension, higher body mass index, and a dyslipidemic profile. HSI differed significantly between H. pylori positive and negative subjects (median 33.2, interquartile range (IQR) 30.0-36.2 for H. pylori-positive vs median 32.6, IQR 29.8-36.0 for negative participants, P = 0.005), but NAFLD-LSF did not [median -1.7, IQR -2.4 - -0.7 vs median -1.8, IQR -2.4-(-0.7), respectively, P = 0.122]. The percentage of people with NAFLD did not differ between infected and uninfected groups: HIS, 26.9% vs 27.1%, P = 0.173; NAFLD-LFS, 23.5% vs 23.1%, P = 0.778. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor, but C-reactive protein concentration and smoking were significant risk factors for NAFLD.

CONCLUSION

H. pylori infection is not a risk factor for NAFLD as indicated by HSI or NAFLD-LFS. Prospective, large-scale studies involving liver biopsies should be considered.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Myong Ki Baeg, Seung Kew Yoon, Sun-Hye Ko, Yong-Sun Noh, In-Seok Lee, Myung-Gyu Choi, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul 137-701, South Korea.Myong Ki Baeg, Seung Kew Yoon, Sun-Hye Ko, Yong-Sun Noh, In-Seok Lee, Myung-Gyu Choi, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul 137-701, South Korea.Myong Ki Baeg, Seung Kew Yoon, Sun-Hye Ko, Yong-Sun Noh, In-Seok Lee, Myung-Gyu Choi, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul 137-701, South Korea.Myong Ki Baeg, Seung Kew Yoon, Sun-Hye Ko, Yong-Sun Noh, In-Seok Lee, Myung-Gyu Choi, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul 137-701, South Korea.Myong Ki Baeg, Seung Kew Yoon, Sun-Hye Ko, Yong-Sun Noh, In-Seok Lee, Myung-Gyu Choi, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul 137-701, South Korea.Myong Ki Baeg, Seung Kew Yoon, Sun-Hye Ko, Yong-Sun Noh, In-Seok Lee, Myung-Gyu Choi, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul 137-701, South Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26937147

Citation

Baeg, Myong Ki, et al. "Helicobacter Pylori Infection Is Not Associated With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease." World Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 22, no. 8, 2016, pp. 2592-600.
Baeg MK, Yoon SK, Ko SH, et al. Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. World J Gastroenterol. 2016;22(8):2592-600.
Baeg, M. K., Yoon, S. K., Ko, S. H., Noh, Y. S., Lee, I. S., & Choi, M. G. (2016). Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 22(8), 2592-600. https://doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v22.i8.2592
Baeg MK, et al. Helicobacter Pylori Infection Is Not Associated With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. World J Gastroenterol. 2016 Feb 28;22(8):2592-600. PubMed PMID: 26937147.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. AU - Baeg,Myong Ki, AU - Yoon,Seung Kew, AU - Ko,Sun-Hye, AU - Noh,Yong-Sun, AU - Lee,In-Seok, AU - Choi,Myung-Gyu, PY - 2015/10/03/received PY - 2015/11/22/revised PY - 2015/12/12/accepted PY - 2016/3/4/entrez PY - 2016/3/5/pubmed PY - 2017/1/25/medline KW - Helicobacter pylori KW - Hepatic steatosis index KW - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease KW - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease liver fat score KW - Urea breath test SP - 2592 EP - 600 JF - World journal of gastroenterology JO - World J Gastroenterol VL - 22 IS - 8 N2 - AIM: To determine whether Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection confers a higher risk of Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: Healthy people who underwent health screening were analyzed retrospectively. Inclusion criteria were age ≥ 20 years, history of H. pylori infection, and recorded insulin level. Participants were classified as H. pylori positive or negative according to (13)C urea breath tests. NAFLD was defined using the hepatic steatosis index (HSI) and NAFLD liver fat score (NAFLD-LFS). Those with an HSI > 36 or NAFLD-LFS > -0.640 were considered to have NAFLD. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors for NAFLD. RESULTS: Three thousand six hundred and sixty-three people were analyzed and 1636 (44.7%) were H. pylori positive. H. pylori infection was associated with older age, male gender, hypertension, higher body mass index, and a dyslipidemic profile. HSI differed significantly between H. pylori positive and negative subjects (median 33.2, interquartile range (IQR) 30.0-36.2 for H. pylori-positive vs median 32.6, IQR 29.8-36.0 for negative participants, P = 0.005), but NAFLD-LSF did not [median -1.7, IQR -2.4 - -0.7 vs median -1.8, IQR -2.4-(-0.7), respectively, P = 0.122]. The percentage of people with NAFLD did not differ between infected and uninfected groups: HIS, 26.9% vs 27.1%, P = 0.173; NAFLD-LFS, 23.5% vs 23.1%, P = 0.778. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor, but C-reactive protein concentration and smoking were significant risk factors for NAFLD. CONCLUSION: H. pylori infection is not a risk factor for NAFLD as indicated by HSI or NAFLD-LFS. Prospective, large-scale studies involving liver biopsies should be considered. SN - 2219-2840 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26937147/Helicobacter_pylori_infection_is_not_associated_with_nonalcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_ L2 - https://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v22/i8/2592.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -