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Body Mass Index and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.

Abstract

Although many epidemiological studies have investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and risk of rheumatoid (RA), the results have been inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a dose-response meta-analysis to quantify the dose-response association between BMI and RA risk.We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases and reference lists of articles for relevant studies published before August 2014 using terms related to BMI and RA. Fixed or random-effects models were used to estimate the pooled relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Several subgroup analyses, sensitivity analyses, and publication bias tests were performed to explore potential study heterogeneity and biasThirteen studies involving 400,609 participants and 13,562 RA cases were included. The RR of RA was 1.21 (95% CI: 1.02-1.44) for obesity, 1.05 (95% CI: 0.97-1.13) for overweight. The risk of RA increased by 13% (RR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.01-1.26) for every 5 kg/m increase in BMI. The subgroup analyses showed a positive association between BMI and RA risk only in women with an RR of 1.26 (95% CI: 1.12-1.40) for obesity and 1.12(95% CI: 1.07-1.18) for every 5 kg/m increase in BMI. Also, an increased risk of RA was found in sero-negative subgroup with an RR of 1.47 (95% CI: 1.11-1.96) for obesity and 1.21 (95% CI: 1.06-1.39) for every 5 kg/m increase in BMI.There is evidence that obesity is a risk factor for developing of RA. Furthermore, the positive association between BMI and RA risk may be stronger among women than men.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

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    From the Department of Health Statistics (JF, QC, FY, SC, ZJ, JH); Department of Rheumatology and Immunology (QC), Department of Information, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China (ZW); and College of Art and Science, University of San Francisco, CA, USA (YL).

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    Source

    Medicine 95:8 2016 Feb pg e2859

    MeSH

    Arthritis, Rheumatoid
    Body Mass Index
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Obesity
    Observational Studies as Topic
    Risk Factors
    Sex Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26937917

    Citation

    Feng, Jian, et al. "Body Mass Index and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis: a Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies." Medicine, vol. 95, no. 8, 2016, pp. e2859.
    Feng J, Chen Q, Yu F, et al. Body Mass Index and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. Medicine (Baltimore). 2016;95(8):e2859.
    Feng, J., Chen, Q., Yu, F., Wang, Z., Chen, S., Jin, Z., ... He, J. (2016). Body Mass Index and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. Medicine, 95(8), pp. e2859. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000002859.
    Feng J, et al. Body Mass Index and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis: a Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. Medicine (Baltimore). 2016;95(8):e2859. PubMed PMID: 26937917.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Body Mass Index and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. AU - Feng,Jian, AU - Chen,Qi, AU - Yu,Feifei, AU - Wang,Zhiyong, AU - Chen,Shuqi, AU - Jin,Zhichao, AU - Cai,Qing, AU - Liu,Yu, AU - He,Jia, PY - 2016/3/4/entrez PY - 2016/3/5/pubmed PY - 2016/7/22/medline SP - e2859 EP - e2859 JF - Medicine JO - Medicine (Baltimore) VL - 95 IS - 8 N2 - Although many epidemiological studies have investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and risk of rheumatoid (RA), the results have been inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a dose-response meta-analysis to quantify the dose-response association between BMI and RA risk.We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases and reference lists of articles for relevant studies published before August 2014 using terms related to BMI and RA. Fixed or random-effects models were used to estimate the pooled relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Several subgroup analyses, sensitivity analyses, and publication bias tests were performed to explore potential study heterogeneity and biasThirteen studies involving 400,609 participants and 13,562 RA cases were included. The RR of RA was 1.21 (95% CI: 1.02-1.44) for obesity, 1.05 (95% CI: 0.97-1.13) for overweight. The risk of RA increased by 13% (RR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.01-1.26) for every 5 kg/m increase in BMI. The subgroup analyses showed a positive association between BMI and RA risk only in women with an RR of 1.26 (95% CI: 1.12-1.40) for obesity and 1.12(95% CI: 1.07-1.18) for every 5 kg/m increase in BMI. Also, an increased risk of RA was found in sero-negative subgroup with an RR of 1.47 (95% CI: 1.11-1.96) for obesity and 1.21 (95% CI: 1.06-1.39) for every 5 kg/m increase in BMI.There is evidence that obesity is a risk factor for developing of RA. Furthermore, the positive association between BMI and RA risk may be stronger among women than men. SN - 1536-5964 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26937917/Body_Mass_Index_and_Risk_of_Rheumatoid_Arthritis:_A_Meta_Analysis_of_Observational_Studies_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=26937917 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -