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Associations between Anticholinergic Burden and Adverse Health Outcomes in Parkinson Disease.
PLoS One. 2016; 11(3):e0150621.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Elderly adults should avoid medications with anticholinergic effects since they may increase the risk of adverse events, including falls, delirium, and cognitive impairment. However, data on anticholinergic burden are limited in subpopulations, such as individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). The objective of this study was to determine whether anticholinergic burden was associated with adverse outcomes in a PD inpatient population.

METHODS

Using the Cerner Health Facts® database, we retrospectively examined anticholinergic medication use, diagnoses, and hospital revisits within a cohort of 16,302 PD inpatients admitted to a Cerner hospital between 2000 and 2011. Anticholinergic burden was computed using the Anticholinergic Risk Scale (ARS). Primary outcomes were associations between ARS score and diagnosis of fracture and delirium. Secondary outcomes included associations between ARS score and 30-day hospital revisits.

RESULTS

Many individuals (57.8%) were prescribed non-PD medications with moderate to very strong anticholinergic potential. Individuals with the greatest ARS score (≥ 4) were more likely to be diagnosed with fractures (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.56, 95% CI: 1.29-1.88) and delirium (AOR: 1.61, 95% CI: 1.08-2.40) relative to those with no anticholinergic burden. Similarly, inpatients with the greatest ARS score were more likely to visit the emergency department (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 1.32, 95% CI: 1.10-1.58) and be readmitted (AHR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.01-1.33) within 30-days of discharge.

CONCLUSIONS

We found a positive association between increased anticholinergic burden and adverse outcomes among individuals with PD. Additional pharmacovigilance studies are needed to better understand risks associated with anticholinergic medication use in PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Fulbright Canada Student, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America. Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America. Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America. Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America. Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.Cerner Corporation, Kansas City, Missouri, United States of America.Cerner Corporation, Kansas City, Missouri, United States of America.C. T. Lamont Primary Health Care Research Centre, Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Bruyère Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.Cardiology Research Institute, University of Buenos Aires, National Research Council (ININCA-UBA-CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina.McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Risk Sciences International, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Risk Sciences International, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26939130

Citation

Crispo, James A G., et al. "Associations Between Anticholinergic Burden and Adverse Health Outcomes in Parkinson Disease." PloS One, vol. 11, no. 3, 2016, pp. e0150621.
Crispo JA, Willis AW, Thibault DP, et al. Associations between Anticholinergic Burden and Adverse Health Outcomes in Parkinson Disease. PLoS One. 2016;11(3):e0150621.
Crispo, J. A., Willis, A. W., Thibault, D. P., Fortin, Y., Hays, H. D., McNair, D. S., Bjerre, L. M., Kohen, D. E., Perez-Lloret, S., Mattison, D. R., & Krewski, D. (2016). Associations between Anticholinergic Burden and Adverse Health Outcomes in Parkinson Disease. PloS One, 11(3), e0150621. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0150621
Crispo JA, et al. Associations Between Anticholinergic Burden and Adverse Health Outcomes in Parkinson Disease. PLoS One. 2016;11(3):e0150621. PubMed PMID: 26939130.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations between Anticholinergic Burden and Adverse Health Outcomes in Parkinson Disease. AU - Crispo,James A G, AU - Willis,Allison W, AU - Thibault,Dylan P, AU - Fortin,Yannick, AU - Hays,Harlen D, AU - McNair,Douglas S, AU - Bjerre,Lise M, AU - Kohen,Dafna E, AU - Perez-Lloret,Santiago, AU - Mattison,Donald R, AU - Krewski,Daniel, Y1 - 2016/03/03/ PY - 2015/12/09/received PY - 2016/02/17/accepted PY - 2016/3/4/entrez PY - 2016/3/5/pubmed PY - 2016/8/3/medline SP - e0150621 EP - e0150621 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 11 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Elderly adults should avoid medications with anticholinergic effects since they may increase the risk of adverse events, including falls, delirium, and cognitive impairment. However, data on anticholinergic burden are limited in subpopulations, such as individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). The objective of this study was to determine whether anticholinergic burden was associated with adverse outcomes in a PD inpatient population. METHODS: Using the Cerner Health Facts® database, we retrospectively examined anticholinergic medication use, diagnoses, and hospital revisits within a cohort of 16,302 PD inpatients admitted to a Cerner hospital between 2000 and 2011. Anticholinergic burden was computed using the Anticholinergic Risk Scale (ARS). Primary outcomes were associations between ARS score and diagnosis of fracture and delirium. Secondary outcomes included associations between ARS score and 30-day hospital revisits. RESULTS: Many individuals (57.8%) were prescribed non-PD medications with moderate to very strong anticholinergic potential. Individuals with the greatest ARS score (≥ 4) were more likely to be diagnosed with fractures (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.56, 95% CI: 1.29-1.88) and delirium (AOR: 1.61, 95% CI: 1.08-2.40) relative to those with no anticholinergic burden. Similarly, inpatients with the greatest ARS score were more likely to visit the emergency department (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 1.32, 95% CI: 1.10-1.58) and be readmitted (AHR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.01-1.33) within 30-days of discharge. CONCLUSIONS: We found a positive association between increased anticholinergic burden and adverse outcomes among individuals with PD. Additional pharmacovigilance studies are needed to better understand risks associated with anticholinergic medication use in PD. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26939130/Associations_between_Anticholinergic_Burden_and_Adverse_Health_Outcomes_in_Parkinson_Disease_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0150621 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -