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Habitual coffee consumption and risk of cognitive decline/dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
Nutrition 2016; 32(6):628-36N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Findings from epidemiologic studies of coffee consumption and risk for cognitive decline or dementia are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of prospective studies to assess the association between coffee consumption and the risk for cognitive decline and dementia.

METHODS

Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed and Embase databases between 1966 and December 2014. Prospective cohorts that reported relative risk (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of coffee consumption with dementia incidence or cognitive changing were eligible. Study-specific RRs were combined by using a random-effects model.

RESULTS

Eleven prospective studies, including 29,155 participants, were included in the meta-analysis. The combined RR indicated that high coffee consumption was not associated with the different measures of cognitive decline or dementia (summary RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.84-1.11). Subgroup analyses suggested a significant inverse association between highest coffee consumption and the risk for Alzheimer disease (summary RR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.55-0.97). The dose-response analysis, including eight studies, did not show an association between the increment of coffee intake and cognitive decline or dementia risk (an increment of 1 cup/d of coffee consumed; summary RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.98-1.02).

CONCLUSIONS

The present study suggests that higher coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk for Alzheimer disease. Further randomized controlled trials or well-designed cohort studies are needed to determine the association between coffee consumption and cognitive decline or dementia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China; Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Department of Neurology, Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China; Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Department of Neurology, Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Department of Pediatrics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Department of Neurology, Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: Xuyun20042001@aliyun.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26944757

Citation

Liu, Qing-Ping, et al. "Habitual Coffee Consumption and Risk of Cognitive Decline/dementia: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 32, no. 6, 2016, pp. 628-36.
Liu QP, Wu YF, Cheng HY, et al. Habitual coffee consumption and risk of cognitive decline/dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Nutrition. 2016;32(6):628-36.
Liu, Q. P., Wu, Y. F., Cheng, H. Y., Xia, T., Ding, H., Wang, H., ... Xu, Y. (2016). Habitual coffee consumption and risk of cognitive decline/dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 32(6), pp. 628-36. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2015.11.015.
Liu QP, et al. Habitual Coffee Consumption and Risk of Cognitive Decline/dementia: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Nutrition. 2016;32(6):628-36. PubMed PMID: 26944757.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Habitual coffee consumption and risk of cognitive decline/dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. AU - Liu,Qing-Ping, AU - Wu,Yan-Feng, AU - Cheng,Hong-Yu, AU - Xia,Tao, AU - Ding,Hong, AU - Wang,Hui, AU - Wang,Ze-Mu, AU - Xu,Yun, Y1 - 2015/12/31/ PY - 2014/11/09/received PY - 2015/11/15/revised PY - 2015/11/20/accepted PY - 2016/3/6/entrez PY - 2016/3/6/pubmed PY - 2017/3/28/medline KW - Alzheimer disease KW - Coffee consumption KW - Cognitive decline KW - Dementia KW - Meta-analysis SP - 628 EP - 36 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 32 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Findings from epidemiologic studies of coffee consumption and risk for cognitive decline or dementia are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of prospective studies to assess the association between coffee consumption and the risk for cognitive decline and dementia. METHODS: Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed and Embase databases between 1966 and December 2014. Prospective cohorts that reported relative risk (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of coffee consumption with dementia incidence or cognitive changing were eligible. Study-specific RRs were combined by using a random-effects model. RESULTS: Eleven prospective studies, including 29,155 participants, were included in the meta-analysis. The combined RR indicated that high coffee consumption was not associated with the different measures of cognitive decline or dementia (summary RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.84-1.11). Subgroup analyses suggested a significant inverse association between highest coffee consumption and the risk for Alzheimer disease (summary RR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.55-0.97). The dose-response analysis, including eight studies, did not show an association between the increment of coffee intake and cognitive decline or dementia risk (an increment of 1 cup/d of coffee consumed; summary RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.98-1.02). CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that higher coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk for Alzheimer disease. Further randomized controlled trials or well-designed cohort studies are needed to determine the association between coffee consumption and cognitive decline or dementia. SN - 1873-1244 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26944757/Habitual_coffee_consumption_and_risk_of_cognitive_decline/dementia:_A_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_of_prospective_cohort_studies_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(15)00538-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -