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Impact of Gestational Weight Gain on Perinatal Outcomes in Obese Women.
Am J Perinatol 2016; 33(9):849-55AJ

Abstract

Objective This study aims to evaluate perinatal outcomes, according to gestational weight gain (GWG) in obese women. Study Design A retrospective cohort of perinatal outcomes in obese women who gained below, within, or above the 2009 Institute of Medicine guidelines and delivered ≥ 36 weeks. Additionally, outcomes, according to the rate of GWG (kg/week; minimal [< 0.16], moderate [0.16-0.49], or excessive [> 0.49]) were compared among women delivering preterm. Results Overall, 5,651 obese women delivered ≥ 36 weeks. GWG above guidelines was associated with increased cesarean section (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-1.72), gestational hypertension (aOR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.21-2.06), and macrosomia (birth weight ≥ 4,000 g) (aOR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.62-2.67). GWG below recommendations was associated with less large for gestational age infants (aOR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.47-0.75). A total of 6,663 women delivered ≥ 20 weeks. Minimal weekly GWG was associated with increased spontaneous preterm birth (aOR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.23-1.98) and more small for gestational age (SGA) infants (aOR: 1.55, 95% CI: 1.19-2.01). Excessive weekly GWG was associated with increased indicated preterm birth (aOR: 1.61, 95% CI: 1.29-2.01), cesarean section (aOR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.20-1.61), preeclampsia (aOR: 1.83, 95% CI: 1.49-2.26), neonatal intensive care unit admission (aOR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.08-1.63), and macrosomia (aOR: 2.40, 95% CI: 1.94-2.96). Conclusions Obese women with excessive GWG had worse outcomes than women with GWG within recommendations. Limited GWG was associated with increased spontaneous preterm birth and SGA infants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama.Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama.Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama.Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama.Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26960701

Citation

Durst, Jennifer K., et al. "Impact of Gestational Weight Gain On Perinatal Outcomes in Obese Women." American Journal of Perinatology, vol. 33, no. 9, 2016, pp. 849-55.
Durst JK, Sutton AL, Cliver SP, et al. Impact of Gestational Weight Gain on Perinatal Outcomes in Obese Women. Am J Perinatol. 2016;33(9):849-55.
Durst, J. K., Sutton, A. L., Cliver, S. P., Tita, A. T., & Biggio, J. R. (2016). Impact of Gestational Weight Gain on Perinatal Outcomes in Obese Women. American Journal of Perinatology, 33(9), pp. 849-55. doi:10.1055/s-0036-1579650.
Durst JK, et al. Impact of Gestational Weight Gain On Perinatal Outcomes in Obese Women. Am J Perinatol. 2016;33(9):849-55. PubMed PMID: 26960701.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of Gestational Weight Gain on Perinatal Outcomes in Obese Women. AU - Durst,Jennifer K, AU - Sutton,Amelia L M, AU - Cliver,Suzanne P, AU - Tita,Alan T, AU - Biggio,Joseph R, Y1 - 2016/03/09/ PY - 2016/3/11/entrez PY - 2016/3/11/pubmed PY - 2018/2/6/medline SP - 849 EP - 55 JF - American journal of perinatology JO - Am J Perinatol VL - 33 IS - 9 N2 - Objective This study aims to evaluate perinatal outcomes, according to gestational weight gain (GWG) in obese women. Study Design A retrospective cohort of perinatal outcomes in obese women who gained below, within, or above the 2009 Institute of Medicine guidelines and delivered ≥ 36 weeks. Additionally, outcomes, according to the rate of GWG (kg/week; minimal [< 0.16], moderate [0.16-0.49], or excessive [> 0.49]) were compared among women delivering preterm. Results Overall, 5,651 obese women delivered ≥ 36 weeks. GWG above guidelines was associated with increased cesarean section (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-1.72), gestational hypertension (aOR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.21-2.06), and macrosomia (birth weight ≥ 4,000 g) (aOR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.62-2.67). GWG below recommendations was associated with less large for gestational age infants (aOR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.47-0.75). A total of 6,663 women delivered ≥ 20 weeks. Minimal weekly GWG was associated with increased spontaneous preterm birth (aOR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.23-1.98) and more small for gestational age (SGA) infants (aOR: 1.55, 95% CI: 1.19-2.01). Excessive weekly GWG was associated with increased indicated preterm birth (aOR: 1.61, 95% CI: 1.29-2.01), cesarean section (aOR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.20-1.61), preeclampsia (aOR: 1.83, 95% CI: 1.49-2.26), neonatal intensive care unit admission (aOR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.08-1.63), and macrosomia (aOR: 2.40, 95% CI: 1.94-2.96). Conclusions Obese women with excessive GWG had worse outcomes than women with GWG within recommendations. Limited GWG was associated with increased spontaneous preterm birth and SGA infants. SN - 1098-8785 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26960701/Impact_of_Gestational_Weight_Gain_on_Perinatal_Outcomes_in_Obese_Women_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0036-1579650 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -