Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Using Seroprevalence and Immunisation Coverage Data to Estimate the Global Burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome, 1996-2010: A Systematic Review.
PLoS One. 2016; 11(3):e0149160.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome (CRS) is typically underestimated in routine surveillance. Updated estimates are needed following the recent WHO position paper on rubella and recent GAVI initiatives, funding rubella vaccination in eligible countries. Previous estimates considered the year 1996 and only 78 (developing) countries.

METHODS

We reviewed the literature to identify rubella seroprevalence studies conducted before countries introduced rubella-containing vaccination (RCV). These data and the estimated vaccination coverage in the routine schedule and mass campaigns were incorporated in mathematical models to estimate the CRS incidence in 1996 and 2000-2010 for each country, region and globally.

RESULTS

The estimated CRS decreased in the three regions (Americas, Europe and Eastern Mediterranean) which had introduced widespread RCV by 2010, reaching <2 per 100,000 live births (the Americas and Europe) and 25 (95% CI 4-61) per 100,000 live births (the Eastern Mediterranean). The estimated incidence in 2010 ranged from 90 (95% CI: 46-195) in the Western Pacific, excluding China, to 116 (95% CI: 56-235) and 121 (95% CI: 31-238) per 100,000 live births in Africa and SE Asia respectively. Highest numbers of cases were predicted in Africa (39,000, 95% CI: 18,000-80,000) and SE Asia (49,000, 95% CI: 11,000-97,000). In 2010, 105,000 (95% CI: 54,000-158,000) CRS cases were estimated globally, compared to 119,000 (95% CI: 72,000-169,000) in 1996.

CONCLUSIONS

Whilst falling dramatically in the Americas, Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean after vaccination, the estimated CRS incidence remains high elsewhere. Well-conducted seroprevalence studies can help to improve the reliability of these estimates and monitor the impact of rubella vaccination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Public Health England, 61 Colindale Ave, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom. London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom.Public Health England, 61 Colindale Ave, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom. Aquarius Population Health, London, United Kingdom. University of Bristol, University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, Canynge Hall, 39 Whatley Road, Bristol BS8 2PS, United Kingdom.London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton RD., NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States of America.Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, United States of America. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States of America.World Health Organization, 20 Ave Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland.Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan.Public Health England, 61 Colindale Ave, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom. Influenza and Measles Laboratory, IOC, Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom. University College London, London, United Kingdom.World Health Organization, 20 Ave Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland.World Health Organization, 20 Ave Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26962867

Citation

Vynnycky, Emilia, et al. "Using Seroprevalence and Immunisation Coverage Data to Estimate the Global Burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome, 1996-2010: a Systematic Review." PloS One, vol. 11, no. 3, 2016, pp. e0149160.
Vynnycky E, Adams EJ, Cutts FT, et al. Using Seroprevalence and Immunisation Coverage Data to Estimate the Global Burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome, 1996-2010: A Systematic Review. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(3):e0149160.
Vynnycky, E., Adams, E. J., Cutts, F. T., Reef, S. E., Navar, A. M., Simons, E., Yoshida, L. M., Brown, D. W., Jackson, C., Strebel, P. M., & Dabbagh, A. J. (2016). Using Seroprevalence and Immunisation Coverage Data to Estimate the Global Burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome, 1996-2010: A Systematic Review. PloS One, 11(3), e0149160. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0149160
Vynnycky E, et al. Using Seroprevalence and Immunisation Coverage Data to Estimate the Global Burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome, 1996-2010: a Systematic Review. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(3):e0149160. PubMed PMID: 26962867.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Using Seroprevalence and Immunisation Coverage Data to Estimate the Global Burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome, 1996-2010: A Systematic Review. AU - Vynnycky,Emilia, AU - Adams,Elisabeth J, AU - Cutts,Felicity T, AU - Reef,Susan E, AU - Navar,Ann Marie, AU - Simons,Emily, AU - Yoshida,Lay-Myint, AU - Brown,David W J, AU - Jackson,Charlotte, AU - Strebel,Peter M, AU - Dabbagh,Alya J, Y1 - 2016/03/10/ PY - 2015/02/09/received PY - 2016/01/28/accepted PY - 2016/3/11/entrez PY - 2016/3/11/pubmed PY - 2016/7/28/medline SP - e0149160 EP - e0149160 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 11 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome (CRS) is typically underestimated in routine surveillance. Updated estimates are needed following the recent WHO position paper on rubella and recent GAVI initiatives, funding rubella vaccination in eligible countries. Previous estimates considered the year 1996 and only 78 (developing) countries. METHODS: We reviewed the literature to identify rubella seroprevalence studies conducted before countries introduced rubella-containing vaccination (RCV). These data and the estimated vaccination coverage in the routine schedule and mass campaigns were incorporated in mathematical models to estimate the CRS incidence in 1996 and 2000-2010 for each country, region and globally. RESULTS: The estimated CRS decreased in the three regions (Americas, Europe and Eastern Mediterranean) which had introduced widespread RCV by 2010, reaching <2 per 100,000 live births (the Americas and Europe) and 25 (95% CI 4-61) per 100,000 live births (the Eastern Mediterranean). The estimated incidence in 2010 ranged from 90 (95% CI: 46-195) in the Western Pacific, excluding China, to 116 (95% CI: 56-235) and 121 (95% CI: 31-238) per 100,000 live births in Africa and SE Asia respectively. Highest numbers of cases were predicted in Africa (39,000, 95% CI: 18,000-80,000) and SE Asia (49,000, 95% CI: 11,000-97,000). In 2010, 105,000 (95% CI: 54,000-158,000) CRS cases were estimated globally, compared to 119,000 (95% CI: 72,000-169,000) in 1996. CONCLUSIONS: Whilst falling dramatically in the Americas, Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean after vaccination, the estimated CRS incidence remains high elsewhere. Well-conducted seroprevalence studies can help to improve the reliability of these estimates and monitor the impact of rubella vaccination. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26962867/full_citation L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0149160 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -