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Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis in North American Women: Analysis of a Large Multicenter Cohort.
Pancreas 2016; 45(7):934-40P

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Historically, chronic pancreatitis (CP) was considered a disease of alcoholic males, but recent data suggest its etiology to be complex. To better understand CP in women, we compared data on women and men with CP in a large, prospectively ascertained multicenter US cohort.

METHODS

Patients with CP enrolled in the NAPS2 Continuation and Validation study were studied. Information on demographics, etiology, risk factors, phenotype, and treatment(s) used was obtained from detailed questionnaires completed by the patients and physicians.

RESULTS

Of 521 cases, 45% were women. Women were significantly (P < 0.05) less likely to have alcohol etiology (30% vs 58.5%) and more likely to have nonalcoholic etiologies (idiopathic, 32% vs 18%; obstructive, 12% vs 2.4%; genetic, 12.8% vs 7.3%). Demographics, pain experience, morphologic findings, exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, CP-related disability, and use of medical therapies were mostly similar in both sexes. Sphincterotomy (biliary, 33% vs 24%; pancreatic, 38% vs 28%; P < 0.05) was performed more frequently in women, whereas cyst/pseudocyst operations were more common in men (6.6 vs 2.6%, P = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

Most CP cases in women are from nonalcoholic etiologies. In contrast to many other chronic diseases, clinical phenotype of CP is determined by the disease and is independent of sex.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the *Digestive Disorders Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC; †Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; ‡Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA; §Department of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA; ∥Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN; ¶Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; #Department of Medicine, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH; **Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL; ††Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL; ‡‡Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Milwaukee, WI; §§Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA; ∥∥Department of Medicine, Griffin Hospital, Derby, CT; ¶¶Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital, Birmingham, AL; and ##Department of Medicine, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26967451

Citation

Romagnuolo, Joseph, et al. "Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis in North American Women: Analysis of a Large Multicenter Cohort." Pancreas, vol. 45, no. 7, 2016, pp. 934-40.
Romagnuolo J, Talluri J, Kennard E, et al. Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis in North American Women: Analysis of a Large Multicenter Cohort. Pancreas. 2016;45(7):934-40.
Romagnuolo, J., Talluri, J., Kennard, E., Sandhu, B. S., Sherman, S., Cote, G. A., ... Yadav, D. (2016). Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis in North American Women: Analysis of a Large Multicenter Cohort. Pancreas, 45(7), pp. 934-40. doi:10.1097/MPA.0000000000000616.
Romagnuolo J, et al. Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis in North American Women: Analysis of a Large Multicenter Cohort. Pancreas. 2016;45(7):934-40. PubMed PMID: 26967451.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis in North American Women: Analysis of a Large Multicenter Cohort. AU - Romagnuolo,Joseph, AU - Talluri,Jyothsna, AU - Kennard,Elizabeth, AU - Sandhu,Bimaljit S, AU - Sherman,Stuart, AU - Cote,Gregory A, AU - Al-Kaade,Samer, AU - Gardner,Timothy B, AU - Gelrud,Andres, AU - Lewis,Michele D, AU - Forsmark,Christopher E, AU - Guda,Nalini M, AU - Conwell,Darwin L, AU - Banks,Peter A, AU - Muniraj,Thiruvengadam, AU - Wisniewski,Stephen R, AU - Tian,Ye, AU - Wilcox,C Mel, AU - Anderson,Michelle A, AU - Brand,Randall E, AU - Slivka,Adam, AU - Whitcomb,David C, AU - Yadav,Dhiraj, PY - 2016/3/12/entrez PY - 2016/3/12/pubmed PY - 2017/3/30/medline SP - 934 EP - 40 JF - Pancreas JO - Pancreas VL - 45 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Historically, chronic pancreatitis (CP) was considered a disease of alcoholic males, but recent data suggest its etiology to be complex. To better understand CP in women, we compared data on women and men with CP in a large, prospectively ascertained multicenter US cohort. METHODS: Patients with CP enrolled in the NAPS2 Continuation and Validation study were studied. Information on demographics, etiology, risk factors, phenotype, and treatment(s) used was obtained from detailed questionnaires completed by the patients and physicians. RESULTS: Of 521 cases, 45% were women. Women were significantly (P < 0.05) less likely to have alcohol etiology (30% vs 58.5%) and more likely to have nonalcoholic etiologies (idiopathic, 32% vs 18%; obstructive, 12% vs 2.4%; genetic, 12.8% vs 7.3%). Demographics, pain experience, morphologic findings, exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, CP-related disability, and use of medical therapies were mostly similar in both sexes. Sphincterotomy (biliary, 33% vs 24%; pancreatic, 38% vs 28%; P < 0.05) was performed more frequently in women, whereas cyst/pseudocyst operations were more common in men (6.6 vs 2.6%, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Most CP cases in women are from nonalcoholic etiologies. In contrast to many other chronic diseases, clinical phenotype of CP is determined by the disease and is independent of sex. SN - 1536-4828 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26967451/Clinical_Profile_Etiology_and_Treatment_of_Chronic_Pancreatitis_in_North_American_Women:_Analysis_of_a_Large_Multicenter_Cohort_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=26967451 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -