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Food-related behavior and intake of adult main meal preparers of 9-10 year-old children participating in iCook 4-H: A five-state childhood obesity prevention pilot study.
Appetite. 2016 Jun 01; 101:163-70.A

Abstract

It is important to understand adult outcomes in childhood obesity prevention programs as parents and caregivers have a significant influence on the eating and physical activity habits of youth. Grounded in the social cognitive theory, the iCook 4-H study was centered on a dyad model (9-10 year-olds and their primary meal preparers) to teach healthy cooking skills, shopping and meal habits, and being active as a family. The program took place in five states and dyads (n = 54) were recruited through flyers, e-mails, and in-person contact. The focus of this article is to provide findings from adult program participants. Demographics and self-reported food intake, procurement, preparation and safety practices, feeding relationships, mealtime routines, and height and weight were collected through surveys at baseline and program completion, which spanned 3 months. Descriptive statistics including two-related samples tests and paired samples t tests were used to assess pre- and post-program survey data responses at p < 0.05 significance level. Most had a bachelor's degree (31%) or some college (29%), about half were white, 66% were married, about 30% of households participated in assistance programs, and 82% were female. At program conclusion, participants significantly improved meal planning, prioritizing healthy meal choices, shopping with a grocery list, and reading Nutrition Facts Labels. There were also significant, positive differences noted in cooking skill confidence (p = 0.015), desire to cook more meals at home, and fewer fast food meals. Adult-youth feeding interactions also significantly improved. There were also significant increases in fruit juice (100%), vegetable soup, and whole grain consumption. Based on results, adults reported improvements in meal planning, cooking, and purchasing skills that were taught in classes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Nutrition and Health Sciences Department, 110 Ruth Leverton Hall, Lincoln, NE 68583-0806, USA. Electronic address: ashmiller316@gmail.com.University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Nutrition and Health Sciences Department, 110 Ruth Leverton Hall, Lincoln, NE 68583-0806, USA. Electronic address: lfranzen2@unl.edu.University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC), College of Nursing - Western Nebraska Division, UNMC College of Nursing/Harms Center, 1601 E. 27th St. Scottsbluff, NE 69361, USA. Electronic address: taguirre@unmc.edu.University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 4-H Youth Development, 114 Agriculture Hall, Lincoln, NE 68583-0700, USA. Electronic address: mkrehbiel2@unl.edu.University of Tennessee, Department of Nutrition, 1215 W. Cumberland Avenue, 229 Jessie Harris Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-1920, USA. Electronic address: scolby1@utk.edu.South Dakota State University, Department of Health and Nutritional Sciences, Box 2203, SWG 443, Brookings, SD 57007, USA. Electronic address: Kendra.kattelmann@sdstate.edu.West Virginia University, Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources & Design, Division of Animal and Nutritional Sciences, G016 Agricultural Science Building, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA. Electronic address: Melissa.Olfert@mail.wvu.edu.University of Maine, School of Food and Agriculture, 5735 Hitchner Hall, Orono, ME 04469, USA. Electronic address: douglas.mathews@maine.edu.University of Maine, School of Food and Agriculture, 5735 Hitchner Hall, Orono, ME 04469, USA. Electronic address: awhite@maine.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26970294

Citation

Miller, Ashley, et al. "Food-related Behavior and Intake of Adult Main Meal Preparers of 9-10 Year-old Children Participating in iCook 4-H: a Five-state Childhood Obesity Prevention Pilot Study." Appetite, vol. 101, 2016, pp. 163-70.
Miller A, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, et al. Food-related behavior and intake of adult main meal preparers of 9-10 year-old children participating in iCook 4-H: A five-state childhood obesity prevention pilot study. Appetite. 2016;101:163-70.
Miller, A., Franzen-Castle, L., Aguirre, T., Krehbiel, M., Colby, S., Kattelmann, K., Olfert, M. D., Mathews, D., & White, A. (2016). Food-related behavior and intake of adult main meal preparers of 9-10 year-old children participating in iCook 4-H: A five-state childhood obesity prevention pilot study. Appetite, 101, 163-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2016.03.006
Miller A, et al. Food-related Behavior and Intake of Adult Main Meal Preparers of 9-10 Year-old Children Participating in iCook 4-H: a Five-state Childhood Obesity Prevention Pilot Study. Appetite. 2016 Jun 1;101:163-70. PubMed PMID: 26970294.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food-related behavior and intake of adult main meal preparers of 9-10 year-old children participating in iCook 4-H: A five-state childhood obesity prevention pilot study. AU - Miller,Ashley, AU - Franzen-Castle,Lisa, AU - Aguirre,Trina, AU - Krehbiel,Michelle, AU - Colby,Sarah, AU - Kattelmann,Kendra, AU - Olfert,Melissa D, AU - Mathews,Douglas, AU - White,Adrienne, Y1 - 2016/03/09/ PY - 2015/09/02/received PY - 2016/01/29/revised PY - 2016/03/03/accepted PY - 2016/3/13/entrez PY - 2016/3/13/pubmed PY - 2017/1/27/medline KW - Adults KW - Cooking skills KW - Meal planning KW - Obesity prevention SP - 163 EP - 70 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 101 N2 - It is important to understand adult outcomes in childhood obesity prevention programs as parents and caregivers have a significant influence on the eating and physical activity habits of youth. Grounded in the social cognitive theory, the iCook 4-H study was centered on a dyad model (9-10 year-olds and their primary meal preparers) to teach healthy cooking skills, shopping and meal habits, and being active as a family. The program took place in five states and dyads (n = 54) were recruited through flyers, e-mails, and in-person contact. The focus of this article is to provide findings from adult program participants. Demographics and self-reported food intake, procurement, preparation and safety practices, feeding relationships, mealtime routines, and height and weight were collected through surveys at baseline and program completion, which spanned 3 months. Descriptive statistics including two-related samples tests and paired samples t tests were used to assess pre- and post-program survey data responses at p < 0.05 significance level. Most had a bachelor's degree (31%) or some college (29%), about half were white, 66% were married, about 30% of households participated in assistance programs, and 82% were female. At program conclusion, participants significantly improved meal planning, prioritizing healthy meal choices, shopping with a grocery list, and reading Nutrition Facts Labels. There were also significant, positive differences noted in cooking skill confidence (p = 0.015), desire to cook more meals at home, and fewer fast food meals. Adult-youth feeding interactions also significantly improved. There were also significant increases in fruit juice (100%), vegetable soup, and whole grain consumption. Based on results, adults reported improvements in meal planning, cooking, and purchasing skills that were taught in classes. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26970294/Food_related_behavior_and_intake_of_adult_main_meal_preparers_of_9_10_year_old_children_participating_in_iCook_4_H:_A_five_state_childhood_obesity_prevention_pilot_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(16)30095-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -