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Antimicrobial activities of six essential oils commonly used as condiments in Brazil against Clostridium perfringens.
Braz J Microbiol. 2016 Apr-Jun; 47(2):424-30.BJ

Abstract

Despite recent advances in food production technology, food-borne diseases (FBD) remain a challenging public health concern. In several countries, including Brazil, Clostridium perfringens is among the five main causative agents of food-borne diseases. The present study determines antimicrobial activities of essential oils of six condiments commonly used in Brazil, viz., Ocimum basilicum L. (basil), Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), Origanum majorana L. (marjoram), Mentha × piperita L. var. Piperita (peppermint), Thymus vulgaris L. (thyme) and Pimpinella anisum L. (anise) against C. perfringens strain A. Chemical compositions of the oils were determined by GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). The identities of the isolated compounds were established from the respective Kováts indices, and a comparison of mass spectral data was made with those reported earlier. The antibacterial activity was assessed from minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) using the microdilution method. Minimum inhibitory concentration values were 1.25mgmL(-1) for thyme, 5.0mgmL(-1) for basil and marjoram, and 10mgmL(-1) for rosemary, peppermint and anise. All oils showed bactericidal activity at their minimum inhibitory concentration, except anise oil, which was only bacteriostatic. The use of essential oils from these common spices might serve as an alternative to the use of chemical preservatives in the control and inactivation of pathogens in commercially produced food systems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Centro Universitário UNIVATES Lajeado, RS, Brazil.Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Centro Universitário UNIVATES Lajeado, RS, Brazil.Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Centro Universitário UNIVATES Lajeado, RS, Brazil.Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Centro Universitário UNIVATES, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Roraima Boa Vista, RR, Brazil.Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Roraima Boa Vista, RR, Brazil.Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Centro Universitário UNIVATES, Lajeado, RS, Brazil. Electronic address: eduardome@univates.br.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26991289

Citation

Radaelli, Marcela, et al. "Antimicrobial Activities of Six Essential Oils Commonly Used as Condiments in Brazil Against Clostridium Perfringens." Brazilian Journal of Microbiology : [publication of the Brazilian Society for Microbiology], vol. 47, no. 2, 2016, pp. 424-30.
Radaelli M, da Silva BP, Weidlich L, et al. Antimicrobial activities of six essential oils commonly used as condiments in Brazil against Clostridium perfringens. Braz J Microbiol. 2016;47(2):424-30.
Radaelli, M., da Silva, B. P., Weidlich, L., Hoehne, L., Flach, A., da Costa, L. A., & Ethur, E. M. (2016). Antimicrobial activities of six essential oils commonly used as condiments in Brazil against Clostridium perfringens. Brazilian Journal of Microbiology : [publication of the Brazilian Society for Microbiology], 47(2), 424-30. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjm.2015.10.001
Radaelli M, et al. Antimicrobial Activities of Six Essential Oils Commonly Used as Condiments in Brazil Against Clostridium Perfringens. Braz J Microbiol. 2016 Apr-Jun;47(2):424-30. PubMed PMID: 26991289.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antimicrobial activities of six essential oils commonly used as condiments in Brazil against Clostridium perfringens. AU - Radaelli,Marcela, AU - da Silva,Bárbara Parraga, AU - Weidlich,Luciana, AU - Hoehne,Lucélia, AU - Flach,Adriana, AU - da Costa,Luiz Antonio Mendonça Alves, AU - Ethur,Eduardo Miranda, Y1 - 2016/03/02/ PY - 2014/08/12/received PY - 2015/10/02/accepted PY - 2016/3/19/entrez PY - 2016/3/19/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - Antimicrobial activity KW - Clostridium perfringens KW - Essential oils KW - Food-borne disease KW - Spices SP - 424 EP - 30 JF - Brazilian journal of microbiology : [publication of the Brazilian Society for Microbiology] JO - Braz J Microbiol VL - 47 IS - 2 N2 - Despite recent advances in food production technology, food-borne diseases (FBD) remain a challenging public health concern. In several countries, including Brazil, Clostridium perfringens is among the five main causative agents of food-borne diseases. The present study determines antimicrobial activities of essential oils of six condiments commonly used in Brazil, viz., Ocimum basilicum L. (basil), Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), Origanum majorana L. (marjoram), Mentha × piperita L. var. Piperita (peppermint), Thymus vulgaris L. (thyme) and Pimpinella anisum L. (anise) against C. perfringens strain A. Chemical compositions of the oils were determined by GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). The identities of the isolated compounds were established from the respective Kováts indices, and a comparison of mass spectral data was made with those reported earlier. The antibacterial activity was assessed from minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) using the microdilution method. Minimum inhibitory concentration values were 1.25mgmL(-1) for thyme, 5.0mgmL(-1) for basil and marjoram, and 10mgmL(-1) for rosemary, peppermint and anise. All oils showed bactericidal activity at their minimum inhibitory concentration, except anise oil, which was only bacteriostatic. The use of essential oils from these common spices might serve as an alternative to the use of chemical preservatives in the control and inactivation of pathogens in commercially produced food systems. SN - 1678-4405 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26991289/Antimicrobial_activities_of_six_essential_oils_commonly_used_as_condiments_in_Brazil_against_Clostridium_perfringens_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -