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Differing effects of high-fat or high-carbohydrate meals on food hedonics in overweight and obese individuals.
Br J Nutr 2016; 115(10):1875-84BJ

Abstract

Although the effects of dietary fat and carbohydrate on satiety are well documented, little is known about the impact of these macronutrients on food hedonics. We examined the effects of ad libitum and isoenergetic meals varying in fat and carbohydrate on satiety, energy intake and food hedonics. In all, sixty-five overweight and obese individuals (BMI=30·9 (sd 3·8) kg/m2) completed two separate test meal days in a randomised order in which they consumed high-fat/low-carbohydrate (HFLC) or low-fat/high-carbohydrate (LFHC) foods. Satiety was measured using subjective appetite ratings to calculate the satiety quotient. Satiation was assessed by intake at ad libitum meals. Hedonic measures of explicit liking (subjective ratings) and implicit wanting (speed of forced choice) for an array of HFLC and LFHC foods were also tested before and after isoenergetic HFLC and LFHC meals. The satiety quotient was greater after ad libitum and isoenergetic meals during the LFHC condition compared with the HFLC condition (P=0·006 and P=0·001, respectively), whereas ad libitum energy intake was lower in the LFHC condition (P<0·001). Importantly, the LFHC meal also reduced explicit liking (P<0·001) and implicit wanting (P=0·011) for HFLC foods compared with the isoenergetic HFLC meal, which failed to suppress the hedonic appeal of subsequent HFLC foods. Therefore, when coupled with increased satiety and lower energy intake, the greater suppression of hedonic appeal for high-fat food seen with LFHC foods provides a further mechanism for why these foods promote better short-term appetite control than HFLC foods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Academy of Sport and Physical Activity, Faculty of Health and Wellbeing,Sheffield Hallam University,Sheffield S10 2BP,UK.2Institute of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health,University of Leeds,Leeds LS2 9JT,UK.2Institute of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health,University of Leeds,Leeds LS2 9JT,UK.2Institute of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health,University of Leeds,Leeds LS2 9JT,UK.2Institute of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health,University of Leeds,Leeds LS2 9JT,UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27001260

Citation

Hopkins, Mark, et al. "Differing Effects of High-fat or High-carbohydrate Meals On Food Hedonics in Overweight and Obese Individuals." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 115, no. 10, 2016, pp. 1875-84.
Hopkins M, Gibbons C, Caudwell P, et al. Differing effects of high-fat or high-carbohydrate meals on food hedonics in overweight and obese individuals. Br J Nutr. 2016;115(10):1875-84.
Hopkins, M., Gibbons, C., Caudwell, P., Blundell, J. E., & Finlayson, G. (2016). Differing effects of high-fat or high-carbohydrate meals on food hedonics in overweight and obese individuals. The British Journal of Nutrition, 115(10), pp. 1875-84. doi:10.1017/S0007114516000775.
Hopkins M, et al. Differing Effects of High-fat or High-carbohydrate Meals On Food Hedonics in Overweight and Obese Individuals. Br J Nutr. 2016 May 28;115(10):1875-84. PubMed PMID: 27001260.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differing effects of high-fat or high-carbohydrate meals on food hedonics in overweight and obese individuals. AU - Hopkins,Mark, AU - Gibbons,Catherine, AU - Caudwell,Phillipa, AU - Blundell,John E, AU - Finlayson,Graham, Y1 - 2016/03/22/ PY - 2016/3/23/entrez PY - 2016/3/24/pubmed PY - 2016/9/1/medline KW - Energy intake KW - Explicit liking KW - Food hedonics KW - HFLC high-fat/low-carbohydrate foods KW - Implicit wanting KW - LFHC low-fat/high-carbohydrate foods KW - LFPQ Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire KW - Macronutrient composition KW - SQ satiety quotient KW - Satiety SP - 1875 EP - 84 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 115 IS - 10 N2 - Although the effects of dietary fat and carbohydrate on satiety are well documented, little is known about the impact of these macronutrients on food hedonics. We examined the effects of ad libitum and isoenergetic meals varying in fat and carbohydrate on satiety, energy intake and food hedonics. In all, sixty-five overweight and obese individuals (BMI=30·9 (sd 3·8) kg/m2) completed two separate test meal days in a randomised order in which they consumed high-fat/low-carbohydrate (HFLC) or low-fat/high-carbohydrate (LFHC) foods. Satiety was measured using subjective appetite ratings to calculate the satiety quotient. Satiation was assessed by intake at ad libitum meals. Hedonic measures of explicit liking (subjective ratings) and implicit wanting (speed of forced choice) for an array of HFLC and LFHC foods were also tested before and after isoenergetic HFLC and LFHC meals. The satiety quotient was greater after ad libitum and isoenergetic meals during the LFHC condition compared with the HFLC condition (P=0·006 and P=0·001, respectively), whereas ad libitum energy intake was lower in the LFHC condition (P<0·001). Importantly, the LFHC meal also reduced explicit liking (P<0·001) and implicit wanting (P=0·011) for HFLC foods compared with the isoenergetic HFLC meal, which failed to suppress the hedonic appeal of subsequent HFLC foods. Therefore, when coupled with increased satiety and lower energy intake, the greater suppression of hedonic appeal for high-fat food seen with LFHC foods provides a further mechanism for why these foods promote better short-term appetite control than HFLC foods. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27001260/Differing_effects_of_high_fat_or_high_carbohydrate_meals_on_food_hedonics_in_overweight_and_obese_individuals_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114516000775/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -