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School District Policies and Adolescents' Soda Consumption.
J Adolesc Health 2016; 59(1):17-23JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are a significant source of calories and added sugars for youth ages 14-18 years in the United States. This study examined the relationship between district-level policies and practices and students' consumption of regular soda, one type of SSB, in 12 large urban school districts.

METHODS

Data from the 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study and 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System were linked by district. The outcome variable was soda consumption and exposure variables were district policies. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) after controlling for student characteristics and district free/reduced-price meal eligibility.

RESULTS

About 18% of students reported consuming regular soda at least once per day. Most districts required high schools to have nutrition education, maintain closed campuses, and required/recommended that schools restrict promotional products and sale of beverages. Fewer districts required/recommended that schools offer healthful alternative beverages. Students in districts that restricted promotional products had lower odds of regular soda consumption (AOR = .84, 95% CI = .71-1.00), as did students in districts that restricted access to SSBs and offered healthful beverages when other beverages were available (AOR = .72, 95% CI = .54-.93, AOR = .76, 95% CI = .63-.91).

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrates that certain district-level policies are associated with student consumption of regular soda. These findings add to a growing consensus that policies and practices that influence the availability of healthier foods and beverages are needed across multiple settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: gferro@cdc.gov.Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for HIV/Aids, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Nutrition Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27021401

Citation

Miller, Gabrielle F., et al. "School District Policies and Adolescents' Soda Consumption." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 59, no. 1, 2016, pp. 17-23.
Miller GF, Sliwa S, Brener ND, et al. School District Policies and Adolescents' Soda Consumption. J Adolesc Health. 2016;59(1):17-23.
Miller, G. F., Sliwa, S., Brener, N. D., Park, S., & Merlo, C. L. (2016). School District Policies and Adolescents' Soda Consumption. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 59(1), pp. 17-23. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.02.003.
Miller GF, et al. School District Policies and Adolescents' Soda Consumption. J Adolesc Health. 2016;59(1):17-23. PubMed PMID: 27021401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - School District Policies and Adolescents' Soda Consumption. AU - Miller,Gabrielle F, AU - Sliwa,Sarah, AU - Brener,Nancy D, AU - Park,Sohyun, AU - Merlo,Caitlin L, Y1 - 2016/03/23/ PY - 2015/10/19/received PY - 2016/02/08/revised PY - 2016/02/08/accepted PY - 2016/3/30/entrez PY - 2016/3/30/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline KW - District policies KW - Nutrition education KW - SHPPS KW - SSB KW - YRBSS SP - 17 EP - 23 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 59 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are a significant source of calories and added sugars for youth ages 14-18 years in the United States. This study examined the relationship between district-level policies and practices and students' consumption of regular soda, one type of SSB, in 12 large urban school districts. METHODS: Data from the 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study and 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System were linked by district. The outcome variable was soda consumption and exposure variables were district policies. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) after controlling for student characteristics and district free/reduced-price meal eligibility. RESULTS: About 18% of students reported consuming regular soda at least once per day. Most districts required high schools to have nutrition education, maintain closed campuses, and required/recommended that schools restrict promotional products and sale of beverages. Fewer districts required/recommended that schools offer healthful alternative beverages. Students in districts that restricted promotional products had lower odds of regular soda consumption (AOR = .84, 95% CI = .71-1.00), as did students in districts that restricted access to SSBs and offered healthful beverages when other beverages were available (AOR = .72, 95% CI = .54-.93, AOR = .76, 95% CI = .63-.91). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that certain district-level policies are associated with student consumption of regular soda. These findings add to a growing consensus that policies and practices that influence the availability of healthier foods and beverages are needed across multiple settings. SN - 1879-1972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27021401/School_District_Policies_and_Adolescents'_Soda_Consumption_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(16)00050-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -