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Factors Associated with Supplemental Formula Feeding of Breastfeeding Infants During Postpartum Hospital Stay.
Breastfeed Med. 2016 05; 11:196-202.BM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine reasons potentially amenable to interventions that mothers choose to supplement breastfeeding with formula in the immediate postpartum period.

STUDY DESIGN

We distributed surveys to all mothers in the postpartum unit who delivered a live newborn on day of maternal discharge to assess feeding behaviors during their inpatient admission. We evaluated, when applicable, their reasons for supplementation and examined cultural and demographic information to uncover trends for formula use and potential areas for provider intervention.

RESULTS

Seven hundred twelve of 1,400 mothers responded, of which 478 (65%) reported supplementing breastfeeding with formula (BF+F). The most common reasons for formula supplementation were perception of inadequate milk supply (36.4%), desire for sleep (35.4%), and a plan to breast and bottle feed (35.2%). Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) was associated with primiparous status (OR 1.95; 95% CI 1.3-3.0), higher education level (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.7-3.9), and having been breastfed as an infant (OR 1.54; 95% CI 1-2.37). Mothers who experienced skin-to-skin contact also had higher rates of EBF (29.5% versus 19.9%). Factors associated with exclusive formula feeding included single marital status, birth of mother in the United States, Catholic religion, multiparity, and cesarean delivery. Religious and cultural factors also played important roles in maternal feeding behaviors.

CONCLUSION

Clinicians can anticipate risk factors for formula use in mothers who plan to breastfeed and tailor counseling appropriately to increase EBF rates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Staten Island University Hospital , Staten Island, New York.Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Staten Island University Hospital , Staten Island, New York.Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Staten Island University Hospital , Staten Island, New York.Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Staten Island University Hospital , Staten Island, New York.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27027901

Citation

Pierro, Joanna, et al. "Factors Associated With Supplemental Formula Feeding of Breastfeeding Infants During Postpartum Hospital Stay." Breastfeeding Medicine : the Official Journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, vol. 11, 2016, pp. 196-202.
Pierro J, Abulaimoun B, Roth P, et al. Factors Associated with Supplemental Formula Feeding of Breastfeeding Infants During Postpartum Hospital Stay. Breastfeed Med. 2016;11:196-202.
Pierro, J., Abulaimoun, B., Roth, P., & Blau, J. (2016). Factors Associated with Supplemental Formula Feeding of Breastfeeding Infants During Postpartum Hospital Stay. Breastfeeding Medicine : the Official Journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, 11, 196-202. https://doi.org/10.1089/bfm.2015.0091
Pierro J, et al. Factors Associated With Supplemental Formula Feeding of Breastfeeding Infants During Postpartum Hospital Stay. Breastfeed Med. 2016;11:196-202. PubMed PMID: 27027901.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors Associated with Supplemental Formula Feeding of Breastfeeding Infants During Postpartum Hospital Stay. AU - Pierro,Joanna, AU - Abulaimoun,Bdair, AU - Roth,Philip, AU - Blau,Jonathan, Y1 - 2016/03/30/ PY - 2016/3/31/entrez PY - 2016/3/31/pubmed PY - 2018/1/30/medline SP - 196 EP - 202 JF - Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine JO - Breastfeed Med VL - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine reasons potentially amenable to interventions that mothers choose to supplement breastfeeding with formula in the immediate postpartum period. STUDY DESIGN: We distributed surveys to all mothers in the postpartum unit who delivered a live newborn on day of maternal discharge to assess feeding behaviors during their inpatient admission. We evaluated, when applicable, their reasons for supplementation and examined cultural and demographic information to uncover trends for formula use and potential areas for provider intervention. RESULTS: Seven hundred twelve of 1,400 mothers responded, of which 478 (65%) reported supplementing breastfeeding with formula (BF+F). The most common reasons for formula supplementation were perception of inadequate milk supply (36.4%), desire for sleep (35.4%), and a plan to breast and bottle feed (35.2%). Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) was associated with primiparous status (OR 1.95; 95% CI 1.3-3.0), higher education level (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.7-3.9), and having been breastfed as an infant (OR 1.54; 95% CI 1-2.37). Mothers who experienced skin-to-skin contact also had higher rates of EBF (29.5% versus 19.9%). Factors associated with exclusive formula feeding included single marital status, birth of mother in the United States, Catholic religion, multiparity, and cesarean delivery. Religious and cultural factors also played important roles in maternal feeding behaviors. CONCLUSION: Clinicians can anticipate risk factors for formula use in mothers who plan to breastfeed and tailor counseling appropriately to increase EBF rates. SN - 1556-8342 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27027901/Factors_Associated_with_Supplemental_Formula_Feeding_of_Breastfeeding_Infants_During_Postpartum_Hospital_Stay_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -