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Statin and Aspirin Use Among Hispanic and Latino Adults at High Cardiovascular Risk: Findings From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Mar 30; 5(4):e002905.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Despite variations in the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and related risk factors among US Hispanic/Latino adults of diverse backgrounds, there is little information on whether disparities exist in the use of medications for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. We examined the prevalence of statin and aspirin use among diverse US Hispanic/Latino adults at high cardiovascular risk.

METHODS AND RESULTS

A multicenter population-based study, the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study Of Latinos, included a total of 16 415 participants of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, South American, and Central American backgrounds who were aged 18 to 74 years and enrolled between March 2008 and June 2011. Our analyses were limited to 4139 participants considered to be at high cardiovascular risk. Age-adjusted prevalence of statin and aspirin use was 25% and 44%, respectively, overall but varied by Hispanic/Latino background among those at high cardiovascular risk; statin use was significantly higher (P<0.001) among adults of Puerto Rican (33%) and Dominican (28%) backgrounds compared with adults of other backgrounds (Mexican, 24%; Cuban, 22%; Central American, 20%; South American, 22%). There was no difference in aspirin use. After adjusting for health insurance coverage, the difference in prevalence of statin use was substantially reduced among participants with a Puerto Rican background, from an odds ratio of 1.73 (95% CI 1.30-2.31) to 1.30 (95% CI 0.97-1.75), and with a Dominican background, from an odds ratio of 1.45 (95% CI 1.04-2.02) to 1.07 (95% CI 0.75-1.52), in comparison to their counterparts.

CONCLUSIONS

Among Hispanic/Latino adults of diverse backgrounds, statin use was more prevalent among adults with Puerto Rican and Dominican backgrounds at high cardiovascular risk. These differences in statin use were explained, in part, by differences in insurance coverage. These findings have important implications for the prevention of disparities in cardiovascular outcomes within the growing US Hispanic/Latino population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacy Systems, Outcomes and Policy, University of Illinois College of Pharmacy, Chicago, IL Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois School of Public Health, Chicago, IL dimaqato@uic.edu.Department of Pharmacy Systems, Outcomes and Policy, University of Illinois College of Pharmacy, Chicago, IL Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois School of Public Health, Chicago, IL.Department of Biostatistics, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL Institute for Minority Health Research, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, IL.Institute for Minority Health Research, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, IL.Department of Pharmacy Systems, Outcomes and Policy, University of Illinois College of Pharmacy, Chicago, IL Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois School of Public Health, Chicago, IL.Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC.Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC.Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY.Institute for Minority Health Research, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, IL.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27030340

Citation

Qato, Dima M., et al. "Statin and Aspirin Use Among Hispanic and Latino Adults at High Cardiovascular Risk: Findings From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos." Journal of the American Heart Association, vol. 5, no. 4, 2016, pp. e002905.
Qato DM, Lee TA, Durazo-Arvizu R, et al. Statin and Aspirin Use Among Hispanic and Latino Adults at High Cardiovascular Risk: Findings From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. J Am Heart Assoc. 2016;5(4):e002905.
Qato, D. M., Lee, T. A., Durazo-Arvizu, R., Wu, D., Wilder, J., Reina, S. A., Cai, J., Gonzalez, F., Talavera, G. A., Ostfeld, R. J., & Daviglus, M. L. (2016). Statin and Aspirin Use Among Hispanic and Latino Adults at High Cardiovascular Risk: Findings From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Journal of the American Heart Association, 5(4), e002905. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.115.002905
Qato DM, et al. Statin and Aspirin Use Among Hispanic and Latino Adults at High Cardiovascular Risk: Findings From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Mar 30;5(4):e002905. PubMed PMID: 27030340.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Statin and Aspirin Use Among Hispanic and Latino Adults at High Cardiovascular Risk: Findings From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. AU - Qato,Dima M, AU - Lee,Todd A, AU - Durazo-Arvizu,Ramon, AU - Wu,Donghong, AU - Wilder,Jocelyn, AU - Reina,Samantha A, AU - Cai,Jianwen, AU - Gonzalez,Franklyn,2nd AU - Talavera,Gregory A, AU - Ostfeld,Robert J, AU - Daviglus,Martha L, Y1 - 2016/03/30/ PY - 2016/4/1/entrez PY - 2016/4/1/pubmed PY - 2016/12/23/medline KW - Hispanic/Latino KW - cardiovascular risk KW - disparities KW - statins SP - e002905 EP - e002905 JF - Journal of the American Heart Association JO - J Am Heart Assoc VL - 5 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite variations in the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and related risk factors among US Hispanic/Latino adults of diverse backgrounds, there is little information on whether disparities exist in the use of medications for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. We examined the prevalence of statin and aspirin use among diverse US Hispanic/Latino adults at high cardiovascular risk. METHODS AND RESULTS: A multicenter population-based study, the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study Of Latinos, included a total of 16 415 participants of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, South American, and Central American backgrounds who were aged 18 to 74 years and enrolled between March 2008 and June 2011. Our analyses were limited to 4139 participants considered to be at high cardiovascular risk. Age-adjusted prevalence of statin and aspirin use was 25% and 44%, respectively, overall but varied by Hispanic/Latino background among those at high cardiovascular risk; statin use was significantly higher (P<0.001) among adults of Puerto Rican (33%) and Dominican (28%) backgrounds compared with adults of other backgrounds (Mexican, 24%; Cuban, 22%; Central American, 20%; South American, 22%). There was no difference in aspirin use. After adjusting for health insurance coverage, the difference in prevalence of statin use was substantially reduced among participants with a Puerto Rican background, from an odds ratio of 1.73 (95% CI 1.30-2.31) to 1.30 (95% CI 0.97-1.75), and with a Dominican background, from an odds ratio of 1.45 (95% CI 1.04-2.02) to 1.07 (95% CI 0.75-1.52), in comparison to their counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Among Hispanic/Latino adults of diverse backgrounds, statin use was more prevalent among adults with Puerto Rican and Dominican backgrounds at high cardiovascular risk. These differences in statin use were explained, in part, by differences in insurance coverage. These findings have important implications for the prevention of disparities in cardiovascular outcomes within the growing US Hispanic/Latino population. SN - 2047-9980 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27030340/Statin_and_Aspirin_Use_Among_Hispanic_and_Latino_Adults_at_High_Cardiovascular_Risk:_Findings_From_the_Hispanic_Community_Health_Study/Study_of_Latinos_ L2 - https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.115.002905?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -