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The relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and neurodegeneration.
Neurodegener Dis Manag. 2016 Apr; 6(2):133-45.ND

Abstract

Homocysteine (Hcy) is a key junction in methionine metabolism. In inherited forms of hyperhomocysteinemia patients develop early vascular damage and cognitive decline. Hyperhomocysteinemia is a common consequence of dietary, behavioral and pathological conditions and is epidemiologically related to different diseases, among them neurodegenerative ones are receiving progressively more attention in the last years. Several detrimental mechanisms that see in Hcy a possible promoter seem to be implicated in neurodegeneration (protein structural and functional modifications, oxidative stress, cellular metabolic derangements, epigenetic modifications, pathological aggregates deposition, endothelial damage and atherothrombosis). Interventional studies exploring B group vitamins administration in terms of prevention of Hcy-related cognitive decline and cerebrovascular involvement have shown scant results. In this review, current and possible alternative/complementary approaches are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Italy, Via Aldo Moro 8, I-44124, Ferrara, Italy.Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Italy, Via Aldo Moro 8, I-44124, Ferrara, Italy.Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Italy, Via Aldo Moro 8, I-44124, Ferrara, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27033101

Citation

Bonetti, Francesco, et al. "The Relationship Between Hyperhomocysteinemia and Neurodegeneration." Neurodegenerative Disease Management, vol. 6, no. 2, 2016, pp. 133-45.
Bonetti F, Brombo G, Zuliani G. The relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and neurodegeneration. Neurodegener Dis Manag. 2016;6(2):133-45.
Bonetti, F., Brombo, G., & Zuliani, G. (2016). The relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative Disease Management, 6(2), 133-45. https://doi.org/10.2217/nmt-2015-0008
Bonetti F, Brombo G, Zuliani G. The Relationship Between Hyperhomocysteinemia and Neurodegeneration. Neurodegener Dis Manag. 2016;6(2):133-45. PubMed PMID: 27033101.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and neurodegeneration. AU - Bonetti,Francesco, AU - Brombo,Gloria, AU - Zuliani,Giovanni, Y1 - 2016/04/01/ PY - 2016/4/2/entrez PY - 2016/4/2/pubmed PY - 2017/1/5/medline KW - B group vitamins KW - cognitive impairment KW - dementia KW - excitotoxicity KW - homocysteine KW - hyperhomocysteinemia KW - neurodegeneration KW - oxidative stress SP - 133 EP - 45 JF - Neurodegenerative disease management JO - Neurodegener Dis Manag VL - 6 IS - 2 N2 - Homocysteine (Hcy) is a key junction in methionine metabolism. In inherited forms of hyperhomocysteinemia patients develop early vascular damage and cognitive decline. Hyperhomocysteinemia is a common consequence of dietary, behavioral and pathological conditions and is epidemiologically related to different diseases, among them neurodegenerative ones are receiving progressively more attention in the last years. Several detrimental mechanisms that see in Hcy a possible promoter seem to be implicated in neurodegeneration (protein structural and functional modifications, oxidative stress, cellular metabolic derangements, epigenetic modifications, pathological aggregates deposition, endothelial damage and atherothrombosis). Interventional studies exploring B group vitamins administration in terms of prevention of Hcy-related cognitive decline and cerebrovascular involvement have shown scant results. In this review, current and possible alternative/complementary approaches are discussed. SN - 1758-2032 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27033101/The_relationship_between_hyperhomocysteinemia_and_neurodegeneration_ L2 - https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/nmt-2015-0008?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -