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Protective benefit of predominant breastfeeding against otitis media may be limited to early childhood: results from a prospective birth cohort study.
Clin Otolaryngol. 2017 Feb; 42(1):29-37.CO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the long-term effects of predominant breastfeeding on incidence of otitis media.

DESIGN

Prospective birth cohort study.

SETTING

The West Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study recruited 2900 mothers through antenatal clinics at the major tertiary obstetric hospital in Perth, Western Australia, between 1989 and 1992.

PARTICIPANTS

In total, 2237 children participated in a 6-year cohort follow-up, and a subset of 1344 were given ear and hearing assessments.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

OM diagnosis at 6 years of age (diagnosed by low-compliance tympanograms, 0-0.1 mmho). This was compared to OM diagnosed at the 3-year cohort follow-up using parent-report measures. Main exposure measures were duration of predominant breastfeeding (defined as the age other milk was introduced) and duration of partial (any) breastfeeding (defined as the age breastfeeding was stopped).

RESULTS

There was a significant, independent association between predominant breastfeeding (OR = 1.33 [1.04, 1.69]; P = 0.02) and OM, and breastfeeding duration (OR = 1.35 [1.08, 1.68]; P = 0.01) with OM at 3 years of age. However, at 6 years of age, this relationship was no longer statistically significant (predominant breastfeeding OR = 0.78 [0.48, 1.06]; P = 0.09; duration of breastfeeding, OR = 1.34 [0.81, 2.23]; P = 0.25).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings are in line with a number of epidemiological studies which show a positive association between breastfeeding and OM in early childhood. However, the long-term follow-up of these children revealed that by 6 years of age, there was no significant influence of breastfeeding on presence of OM. These results suggest that the protective effect of predominant breastfeeding for at least 6 months does not extend to school-age children, where other social and environmental factors may be stronger predictors of OM.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA, Australia. Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia.Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA, Australia. Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. School of Population Health, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia.Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA, Australia. Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA, Australia. Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27037737

Citation

Brennan-Jones, C G., et al. "Protective Benefit of Predominant Breastfeeding Against Otitis Media May Be Limited to Early Childhood: Results From a Prospective Birth Cohort Study." Clinical Otolaryngology : Official Journal of ENT-UK ; Official Journal of Netherlands Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology & Cervico-Facial Surgery, vol. 42, no. 1, 2017, pp. 29-37.
Brennan-Jones CG, Eikelboom RH, Jacques A, et al. Protective benefit of predominant breastfeeding against otitis media may be limited to early childhood: results from a prospective birth cohort study. Clin Otolaryngol. 2017;42(1):29-37.
Brennan-Jones, C. G., Eikelboom, R. H., Jacques, A., Swanepoel, D., Atlas, M. D., Whitehouse, A. J., Jamieson, S. E., & Oddy, W. H. (2017). Protective benefit of predominant breastfeeding against otitis media may be limited to early childhood: results from a prospective birth cohort study. Clinical Otolaryngology : Official Journal of ENT-UK ; Official Journal of Netherlands Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology & Cervico-Facial Surgery, 42(1), 29-37. https://doi.org/10.1111/coa.12652
Brennan-Jones CG, et al. Protective Benefit of Predominant Breastfeeding Against Otitis Media May Be Limited to Early Childhood: Results From a Prospective Birth Cohort Study. Clin Otolaryngol. 2017;42(1):29-37. PubMed PMID: 27037737.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Protective benefit of predominant breastfeeding against otitis media may be limited to early childhood: results from a prospective birth cohort study. AU - Brennan-Jones,C G, AU - Eikelboom,R H, AU - Jacques,A, AU - Swanepoel,D, AU - Atlas,M D, AU - Whitehouse,A J O, AU - Jamieson,S E, AU - Oddy,W H, Y1 - 2016/04/24/ PY - 2016/03/20/accepted PY - 2016/4/3/pubmed PY - 2017/10/31/medline PY - 2016/4/3/entrez SP - 29 EP - 37 JF - Clinical otolaryngology : official journal of ENT-UK ; official journal of Netherlands Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology & Cervico-Facial Surgery JO - Clin Otolaryngol VL - 42 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the long-term effects of predominant breastfeeding on incidence of otitis media. DESIGN: Prospective birth cohort study. SETTING: The West Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study recruited 2900 mothers through antenatal clinics at the major tertiary obstetric hospital in Perth, Western Australia, between 1989 and 1992. PARTICIPANTS: In total, 2237 children participated in a 6-year cohort follow-up, and a subset of 1344 were given ear and hearing assessments. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: OM diagnosis at 6 years of age (diagnosed by low-compliance tympanograms, 0-0.1 mmho). This was compared to OM diagnosed at the 3-year cohort follow-up using parent-report measures. Main exposure measures were duration of predominant breastfeeding (defined as the age other milk was introduced) and duration of partial (any) breastfeeding (defined as the age breastfeeding was stopped). RESULTS: There was a significant, independent association between predominant breastfeeding (OR = 1.33 [1.04, 1.69]; P = 0.02) and OM, and breastfeeding duration (OR = 1.35 [1.08, 1.68]; P = 0.01) with OM at 3 years of age. However, at 6 years of age, this relationship was no longer statistically significant (predominant breastfeeding OR = 0.78 [0.48, 1.06]; P = 0.09; duration of breastfeeding, OR = 1.34 [0.81, 2.23]; P = 0.25). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are in line with a number of epidemiological studies which show a positive association between breastfeeding and OM in early childhood. However, the long-term follow-up of these children revealed that by 6 years of age, there was no significant influence of breastfeeding on presence of OM. These results suggest that the protective effect of predominant breastfeeding for at least 6 months does not extend to school-age children, where other social and environmental factors may be stronger predictors of OM. SN - 1749-4486 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27037737/Protective_benefit_of_predominant_breastfeeding_against_otitis_media_may_be_limited_to_early_childhood:_results_from_a_prospective_birth_cohort_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/coa.12652 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -