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The association of soy food consumption with the risk of subtype of breast cancers defined by hormone receptor and HER2 status.
Int J Cancer 2016; 139(4):742-8IJ

Abstract

Soy food intake has previously been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Epidemiological evidence for subgroups of breast cancer, particularly by menopausal and hormone receptor status, is less consistent. To evaluate the role of hormone receptor and menopausal status on the association between soy food intake and breast cancer risk, we measured usual soy food intake in adolescence and adulthood via food frequency questionnaire in 70,578 Chinese women, aged 40-70 years, recruited to the Shanghai Women's Health Study (1996-2000). After a median follow-up of 13.2 years (range: 0.01-15.0), 1,034 incident breast cancer cases were identified. Using Cox models, we found that adult soy intake was inversely associated with breast cancer risk [hazard ratio (HR) for fifth versus first quintile soy protein intake = 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI):0.63-0.97]. The association was predominantly seen in premenopausal women (HR = 0.46; 95% CI:0.29-0.74). Analyses further stratified by hormone receptor status showed that adult soy intake was associated with significantly decreased risk of estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ breast cancer in postmenopausal women (HR = 0.72; 95% CI:0.53-0.96) and decreased risk of ER-/PR- breast cancer in premenopausal women (HR = 0.46; 95% CI:0.22-0.97). The soy association did not vary by human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2) status. Furthermore, we found that high soy intake during adulthood and adolescence was associated with reduced premenopausal breast cancer risk (HR = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.32-0.88; comparing third vs. first tertile) while high adulthood soy intake was associated with postmenopausal breast cancer only when adolescent intake was low (HR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43-0.91). Our study suggests that hormonal status, menopausal status and time window of exposure are important factors influencing the soy-breast cancer association.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN.Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN.Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27038352

Citation

Baglia, Michelle L., et al. "The Association of Soy Food Consumption With the Risk of Subtype of Breast Cancers Defined By Hormone Receptor and HER2 Status." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 139, no. 4, 2016, pp. 742-8.
Baglia ML, Zheng W, Li H, et al. The association of soy food consumption with the risk of subtype of breast cancers defined by hormone receptor and HER2 status. Int J Cancer. 2016;139(4):742-8.
Baglia, M. L., Zheng, W., Li, H., Yang, G., Gao, J., Gao, Y. T., & Shu, X. O. (2016). The association of soy food consumption with the risk of subtype of breast cancers defined by hormone receptor and HER2 status. International Journal of Cancer, 139(4), pp. 742-8. doi:10.1002/ijc.30117.
Baglia ML, et al. The Association of Soy Food Consumption With the Risk of Subtype of Breast Cancers Defined By Hormone Receptor and HER2 Status. Int J Cancer. 2016 Aug 15;139(4):742-8. PubMed PMID: 27038352.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association of soy food consumption with the risk of subtype of breast cancers defined by hormone receptor and HER2 status. AU - Baglia,Michelle L, AU - Zheng,Wei, AU - Li,Honglan, AU - Yang,Gong, AU - Gao,Jing, AU - Gao,Yu-Tang, AU - Shu,Xiao-Ou, Y1 - 2016/05/05/ PY - 2015/09/22/received PY - 2016/03/18/accepted PY - 2016/4/3/entrez PY - 2016/4/3/pubmed PY - 2017/4/30/medline KW - adolescence KW - breast cancer KW - hormone receptor status KW - menopausal status KW - soy SP - 742 EP - 8 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 139 IS - 4 N2 - Soy food intake has previously been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Epidemiological evidence for subgroups of breast cancer, particularly by menopausal and hormone receptor status, is less consistent. To evaluate the role of hormone receptor and menopausal status on the association between soy food intake and breast cancer risk, we measured usual soy food intake in adolescence and adulthood via food frequency questionnaire in 70,578 Chinese women, aged 40-70 years, recruited to the Shanghai Women's Health Study (1996-2000). After a median follow-up of 13.2 years (range: 0.01-15.0), 1,034 incident breast cancer cases were identified. Using Cox models, we found that adult soy intake was inversely associated with breast cancer risk [hazard ratio (HR) for fifth versus first quintile soy protein intake = 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI):0.63-0.97]. The association was predominantly seen in premenopausal women (HR = 0.46; 95% CI:0.29-0.74). Analyses further stratified by hormone receptor status showed that adult soy intake was associated with significantly decreased risk of estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ breast cancer in postmenopausal women (HR = 0.72; 95% CI:0.53-0.96) and decreased risk of ER-/PR- breast cancer in premenopausal women (HR = 0.46; 95% CI:0.22-0.97). The soy association did not vary by human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2) status. Furthermore, we found that high soy intake during adulthood and adolescence was associated with reduced premenopausal breast cancer risk (HR = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.32-0.88; comparing third vs. first tertile) while high adulthood soy intake was associated with postmenopausal breast cancer only when adolescent intake was low (HR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43-0.91). Our study suggests that hormonal status, menopausal status and time window of exposure are important factors influencing the soy-breast cancer association. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27038352/The_association_of_soy_food_consumption_with_the_risk_of_subtype_of_breast_cancers_defined_by_hormone_receptor_and_HER2_status_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.30117 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -