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Preconceptional exposure to oral contraceptive pills and the risk of wheeze, asthma and rhinitis in children.
Allergol Int 2016; 65(3):327-31AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The prevalence of maternal oral contraceptive pills (OCP) use and that of childhood asthma are high in western countries. The aim of this study is to examine the association of OCP use with childhood wheeze and allergic diseases in Japan.

METHODS

Relevant data were extracted from a hospital based birth cohort study named as Tokyo-Children's Health, Illness and Development Study (T-CHILD) of which questionnaire conducted during pregnancy included maternal history and duration of OCP use. To identify wheeze and allergic diseases in the children, the questionnaire of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) was used. Logistic regression models were applied to estimate those association and adjustments were made for maternal history of allergy, maternal education level, maternal age at pregnancy, maternal BMI, maternal smoking during pregnancy, mode of delivery, gestational age at delivery, daycare attendance, number of previous live births, and gender of child.

RESULTS

OCP use was associated with ever wheeze (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-2.40), current wheeze (aOR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.01-2.50), ever asthma (aOR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.02-2.65), and ever rhinitis (aOR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.30-2.80). Compared with no prior OCP use, using OCP for more than three months statistically increased the odds of ever wheeze (P = 0.012), current wheeze (P = 0.035), and ever rhinitis (P = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings suggest that maternal OCP use has a role in the development of wheeze, asthma and rhinitis in children. Extended use of OCP is likely to increase the risk of wheeze and rhinitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Allergy, Department of Medical Subspecialties, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Health and Psychosocial Medicine, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Aichi, Japan.Division of Allergy, Department of Medical Subspecialties, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan; Division of Pediatrics, Nagoya Medical Center, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.Division of Allergy, Department of Medical Subspecialties, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.Division of Allergy, Department of Medical Subspecialties, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.Division of Allergy, Department of Medical Subspecialties, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Health and Psychosocial Medicine, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Aichi, Japan.Department of Allergy and Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.Division of Allergy, Department of Medical Subspecialties, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: ohya-y@ncchd.go.jp.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27038776

Citation

Yamamoto-Hanada, Kiwako, et al. "Preconceptional Exposure to Oral Contraceptive Pills and the Risk of Wheeze, Asthma and Rhinitis in Children." Allergology International : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Allergology, vol. 65, no. 3, 2016, pp. 327-31.
Yamamoto-Hanada K, Futamura M, Yang L, et al. Preconceptional exposure to oral contraceptive pills and the risk of wheeze, asthma and rhinitis in children. Allergol Int. 2016;65(3):327-31.
Yamamoto-Hanada, K., Futamura, M., Yang, L., Shoda, T., Narita, M., Kobayashi, F., ... Ohya, Y. (2016). Preconceptional exposure to oral contraceptive pills and the risk of wheeze, asthma and rhinitis in children. Allergology International : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Allergology, 65(3), pp. 327-31. doi:10.1016/j.alit.2016.02.012.
Yamamoto-Hanada K, et al. Preconceptional Exposure to Oral Contraceptive Pills and the Risk of Wheeze, Asthma and Rhinitis in Children. Allergol Int. 2016;65(3):327-31. PubMed PMID: 27038776.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preconceptional exposure to oral contraceptive pills and the risk of wheeze, asthma and rhinitis in children. AU - Yamamoto-Hanada,Kiwako, AU - Futamura,Masaki, AU - Yang,Limin, AU - Shoda,Tetsuo, AU - Narita,Masami, AU - Kobayashi,Fumio, AU - Saito,Hirohisa, AU - Ohya,Yukihiro, Y1 - 2016/03/30/ PY - 2015/12/24/received PY - 2016/02/24/revised PY - 2016/02/28/accepted PY - 2016/4/4/entrez PY - 2016/4/4/pubmed PY - 2017/1/19/medline KW - Asthma KW - Birth cohort KW - Oral contraceptives KW - Rhinitis KW - Wheeze SP - 327 EP - 31 JF - Allergology international : official journal of the Japanese Society of Allergology JO - Allergol Int VL - 65 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The prevalence of maternal oral contraceptive pills (OCP) use and that of childhood asthma are high in western countries. The aim of this study is to examine the association of OCP use with childhood wheeze and allergic diseases in Japan. METHODS: Relevant data were extracted from a hospital based birth cohort study named as Tokyo-Children's Health, Illness and Development Study (T-CHILD) of which questionnaire conducted during pregnancy included maternal history and duration of OCP use. To identify wheeze and allergic diseases in the children, the questionnaire of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) was used. Logistic regression models were applied to estimate those association and adjustments were made for maternal history of allergy, maternal education level, maternal age at pregnancy, maternal BMI, maternal smoking during pregnancy, mode of delivery, gestational age at delivery, daycare attendance, number of previous live births, and gender of child. RESULTS: OCP use was associated with ever wheeze (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-2.40), current wheeze (aOR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.01-2.50), ever asthma (aOR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.02-2.65), and ever rhinitis (aOR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.30-2.80). Compared with no prior OCP use, using OCP for more than three months statistically increased the odds of ever wheeze (P = 0.012), current wheeze (P = 0.035), and ever rhinitis (P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that maternal OCP use has a role in the development of wheeze, asthma and rhinitis in children. Extended use of OCP is likely to increase the risk of wheeze and rhinitis. SN - 1440-1592 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27038776/Preconceptional_exposure_to_oral_contraceptive_pills_and_the_risk_of_wheeze_asthma_and_rhinitis_in_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1323-8930(16)30006-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -