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Severe rhabdomyolysis from red-bellied black snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus) envenoming despite antivenom.
Toxicon 2016; 117:46-8T

Abstract

Envenoming by the Australian red-bellied black snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus) causes non-specific systemic symptoms, anticoagulant coagulopathy, myotoxicity and local effects. Current management for systemic envenoming includes administration of one vial of tiger snake antivenom within 6 h of the bite to prevent myotoxicity. We present a case of severe rhabdomyolysis in a 16 year old male which developed despite early administration of one vial of tiger snake antivenom. Free venom was detected after the administration of antivenom concurrent with rapidly decreasing antivenom concentrations. The case suggests that insufficient antivenom was administered and the use of larger doses of antivenom need to be explored for red-bellied black snake envenoming.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children's Critical Care Unit, Gold Coast University Hospital, Queensland, Australia.Children's Critical Care Unit, Gold Coast University Hospital, Queensland, Australia.Clinical Toxicology Research Group, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia; NSW Poison Information Centre, Children's Hospital Westmead, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: geoff.isbister@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27039255

Citation

Lim, Adeline Y L., et al. "Severe Rhabdomyolysis From Red-bellied Black Snake (Pseudechis Porphyriacus) Envenoming Despite Antivenom." Toxicon : Official Journal of the International Society On Toxinology, vol. 117, 2016, pp. 46-8.
Lim AY, Singh PN, Isbister GK. Severe rhabdomyolysis from red-bellied black snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus) envenoming despite antivenom. Toxicon. 2016;117:46-8.
Lim, A. Y., Singh, P. N., & Isbister, G. K. (2016). Severe rhabdomyolysis from red-bellied black snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus) envenoming despite antivenom. Toxicon : Official Journal of the International Society On Toxinology, 117, pp. 46-8. doi:10.1016/j.toxicon.2016.03.016.
Lim AY, Singh PN, Isbister GK. Severe Rhabdomyolysis From Red-bellied Black Snake (Pseudechis Porphyriacus) Envenoming Despite Antivenom. Toxicon. 2016;117:46-8. PubMed PMID: 27039255.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe rhabdomyolysis from red-bellied black snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus) envenoming despite antivenom. AU - Lim,Adeline Y L, AU - Singh,Puneet N, AU - Isbister,Geoffrey K, Y1 - 2016/03/31/ PY - 2016/02/18/received PY - 2016/03/16/revised PY - 2016/03/23/accepted PY - 2016/4/4/entrez PY - 2016/4/4/pubmed PY - 2017/5/19/medline KW - Antivenom KW - Black snake KW - Pseudechis porphyriacus KW - Rhabdomyolysis KW - Snake envenoming KW - Venom SP - 46 EP - 8 JF - Toxicon : official journal of the International Society on Toxinology JO - Toxicon VL - 117 N2 - Envenoming by the Australian red-bellied black snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus) causes non-specific systemic symptoms, anticoagulant coagulopathy, myotoxicity and local effects. Current management for systemic envenoming includes administration of one vial of tiger snake antivenom within 6 h of the bite to prevent myotoxicity. We present a case of severe rhabdomyolysis in a 16 year old male which developed despite early administration of one vial of tiger snake antivenom. Free venom was detected after the administration of antivenom concurrent with rapidly decreasing antivenom concentrations. The case suggests that insufficient antivenom was administered and the use of larger doses of antivenom need to be explored for red-bellied black snake envenoming. SN - 1879-3150 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27039255/Severe_rhabdomyolysis_from_red_bellied_black_snake__Pseudechis_porphyriacus__envenoming_despite_antivenom_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0041-0101(16)30055-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -