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Association between Parent and Child Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes as Assessed by 24-h Urinary Excretion.
Nutrients. 2016 Apr 01; 8(4):191.N

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the association between parent and child sodium (Na) and potassium (K) intake as assessed by 24-h urinary excretion (24hUE). Primary school children and their parent(s) provided one 24-h urine sample and information on cooking and children's discretionary salt use. Valid urine samples were provided by 108 mothers (mean age 41.8 (5.1) (SD) years, Na 120 (45) mmol/day) (7.0 g/day salt equivalent) and 40 fathers (44.4 (4.9) years, Na 152 (49) mmol/day (8.9 g/day salt), and 168 offspring (51.8% male, age 9.1 (2.0) years, Na 101 (47) mmol/day (5.9 g/day salt). When adjusted for parental age, child age and gender a 17 mmol/day Na (1 g/day salt) increase in mother's 24hUE was associated with a 3.4 mmol/day Na (0.2 g/day salt) increase in child's salt 24hUE (p = 0.04) with no association observed between father and child. Sixty-seven percent of parents added salt during cooking and 37% of children added salt at the table. Children who reported adding table salt had higher urinary excretion than those who did not (p = 0.01). The association between mother and child Na intake may relate to the consumption of similar foods and highlights the importance of the home environment in influencing total dietary sodium intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia. c.service@deakin.edu.au.Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia. carley.grimes@deakin.edu.Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia. lynn.riddell@deakin.edu.au.Centre for Environmental and Preventative Medicine, Wolfson Institute of Preventative Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. f.he@qmul.ac.uk.Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia. karen.campbell@deakin.edu.au.Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia. caryl.nowson@deakin.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27043620

Citation

Service, Carrie, et al. "Association Between Parent and Child Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes as Assessed By 24-h Urinary Excretion." Nutrients, vol. 8, no. 4, 2016, p. 191.
Service C, Grimes C, Riddell L, et al. Association between Parent and Child Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes as Assessed by 24-h Urinary Excretion. Nutrients. 2016;8(4):191.
Service, C., Grimes, C., Riddell, L., He, F., Campbell, K., & Nowson, C. (2016). Association between Parent and Child Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes as Assessed by 24-h Urinary Excretion. Nutrients, 8(4), 191. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu8040191
Service C, et al. Association Between Parent and Child Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes as Assessed By 24-h Urinary Excretion. Nutrients. 2016 Apr 1;8(4):191. PubMed PMID: 27043620.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between Parent and Child Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes as Assessed by 24-h Urinary Excretion. AU - Service,Carrie, AU - Grimes,Carley, AU - Riddell,Lynn, AU - He,Feng, AU - Campbell,Karen, AU - Nowson,Caryl, Y1 - 2016/04/01/ PY - 2016/01/20/received PY - 2016/03/17/revised PY - 2016/03/28/accepted PY - 2016/4/5/entrez PY - 2016/4/5/pubmed PY - 2016/12/24/medline KW - Australia KW - dietary potassium KW - dietary salt KW - nutrient KW - parent-child KW - urinary sodium SP - 191 EP - 191 JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 8 IS - 4 N2 - The aim of this study was to assess the association between parent and child sodium (Na) and potassium (K) intake as assessed by 24-h urinary excretion (24hUE). Primary school children and their parent(s) provided one 24-h urine sample and information on cooking and children's discretionary salt use. Valid urine samples were provided by 108 mothers (mean age 41.8 (5.1) (SD) years, Na 120 (45) mmol/day) (7.0 g/day salt equivalent) and 40 fathers (44.4 (4.9) years, Na 152 (49) mmol/day (8.9 g/day salt), and 168 offspring (51.8% male, age 9.1 (2.0) years, Na 101 (47) mmol/day (5.9 g/day salt). When adjusted for parental age, child age and gender a 17 mmol/day Na (1 g/day salt) increase in mother's 24hUE was associated with a 3.4 mmol/day Na (0.2 g/day salt) increase in child's salt 24hUE (p = 0.04) with no association observed between father and child. Sixty-seven percent of parents added salt during cooking and 37% of children added salt at the table. Children who reported adding table salt had higher urinary excretion than those who did not (p = 0.01). The association between mother and child Na intake may relate to the consumption of similar foods and highlights the importance of the home environment in influencing total dietary sodium intake. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27043620/Association_between_Parent_and_Child_Dietary_Sodium_and_Potassium_Intakes_as_Assessed_by_24_h_Urinary_Excretion_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu8040191 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -