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Risk factors for postpartum depression in women living with HIV attending prevention of mother-to-child transmission clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi.
AIDS Care. 2016 07; 28(7):884-9.AC

Abstract

Mothers with HIV are at high risk of a range of psychosocial issues that may impact HIV disease progression for themselves and their children. Stigma has also become a substantial barrier to accessing HIV/AIDS care and prevention services. The study objective was to determine the prevalence and severity of postpartum depression (PPD) among women living with HIV and to further understand the impact of stigma and other psychosocial factors in 123 women living with HIV attending prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital located in Nairobi, Kenya. We used the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and HIV/AIDS Stigma Instrument - PLWHA (HASI - P). Forty-eight percent (N = 59) of women screened positive for elevated depressive symptoms. Eleven (9%) of the participants reported high levels of stigma. Multivariate analyses showed that lower education (OR = 0.14, 95% CI [0.04-0.46], p = .001) and lack of family support (OR = 2.49, 95% CI [1.14-5.42], p = .02) were associated with the presence of elevated depressive symptoms. The presence of stigma implied more than ninefold risk of development of PPD (OR = 9.44, 95% CI [1.132-78.79], p = .04). Stigma was positively correlated with an increase in PPD. PMTCT is an ideal context to reach out to women to address mental health problems especially depression screening and offering psychosocial treatments bolstering quality of life of the mother-baby dyad.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Psychiatry , University of Nairobi , Nairobi , Kenya.a Department of Psychiatry , University of Nairobi , Nairobi , Kenya.b Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences , University of Washington , Seattle , WA , USA. c Department of Epidemiology , University of Washington , Seattle , WA , USA.b Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences , University of Washington , Seattle , WA , USA. d Department of Global Health , University of Washington , Seattle , WA , USA.a Department of Psychiatry , University of Nairobi , Nairobi , Kenya.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27045273

Citation

Yator, Obadia, et al. "Risk Factors for Postpartum Depression in Women Living With HIV Attending Prevention of Mother-to-child Transmission Clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi." AIDS Care, vol. 28, no. 7, 2016, pp. 884-9.
Yator O, Mathai M, Vander Stoep A, et al. Risk factors for postpartum depression in women living with HIV attending prevention of mother-to-child transmission clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. AIDS Care. 2016;28(7):884-9.
Yator, O., Mathai, M., Vander Stoep, A., Rao, D., & Kumar, M. (2016). Risk factors for postpartum depression in women living with HIV attending prevention of mother-to-child transmission clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. AIDS Care, 28(7), 884-9. https://doi.org/10.1080/09540121.2016.1160026
Yator O, et al. Risk Factors for Postpartum Depression in Women Living With HIV Attending Prevention of Mother-to-child Transmission Clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. AIDS Care. 2016;28(7):884-9. PubMed PMID: 27045273.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk factors for postpartum depression in women living with HIV attending prevention of mother-to-child transmission clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. AU - Yator,Obadia, AU - Mathai,Muthoni, AU - Vander Stoep,Ann, AU - Rao,Deepa, AU - Kumar,Manasi, Y1 - 2016/04/04/ PY - 2016/4/6/entrez PY - 2016/4/6/pubmed PY - 2017/7/14/medline KW - HIV KW - Postpartum KW - depression KW - prevention of mother-to-child transmission KW - stigma SP - 884 EP - 9 JF - AIDS care JO - AIDS Care VL - 28 IS - 7 N2 - Mothers with HIV are at high risk of a range of psychosocial issues that may impact HIV disease progression for themselves and their children. Stigma has also become a substantial barrier to accessing HIV/AIDS care and prevention services. The study objective was to determine the prevalence and severity of postpartum depression (PPD) among women living with HIV and to further understand the impact of stigma and other psychosocial factors in 123 women living with HIV attending prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital located in Nairobi, Kenya. We used the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and HIV/AIDS Stigma Instrument - PLWHA (HASI - P). Forty-eight percent (N = 59) of women screened positive for elevated depressive symptoms. Eleven (9%) of the participants reported high levels of stigma. Multivariate analyses showed that lower education (OR = 0.14, 95% CI [0.04-0.46], p = .001) and lack of family support (OR = 2.49, 95% CI [1.14-5.42], p = .02) were associated with the presence of elevated depressive symptoms. The presence of stigma implied more than ninefold risk of development of PPD (OR = 9.44, 95% CI [1.132-78.79], p = .04). Stigma was positively correlated with an increase in PPD. PMTCT is an ideal context to reach out to women to address mental health problems especially depression screening and offering psychosocial treatments bolstering quality of life of the mother-baby dyad. SN - 1360-0451 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27045273/Risk_factors_for_postpartum_depression_in_women_living_with_HIV_attending_prevention_of_mother_to_child_transmission_clinic_at_Kenyatta_National_Hospital_Nairobi_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09540121.2016.1160026 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -