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Coronavirus Infection and Diversity in Bats in the Australasian Region.
Ecohealth. 2016 Mar; 13(1):72-82.E

Abstract

Following the SARS outbreak, extensive surveillance was undertaken globally to detect and identify coronavirus diversity in bats. This study sought to identify the diversity and prevalence of coronaviruses in bats in the Australasian region. We identified four different genotypes of coronavirus, three of which (an alphacoronavirus and two betacoronaviruses) are potentially new species, having less than 90% nucleotide sequence identity with the most closely related described viruses. We did not detect any SARS-like betacoronaviruses, despite targeting rhinolophid bats, the putative natural host taxa. Our findings support the virus-host co-evolution hypothesis, with the detection of Miniopterus bat coronavirus HKU8 (previously reported in Miniopterus species in China, Hong Kong and Bulgaria) in Australian Miniopterus species. Similarly, we detected a novel betacoronavirus genotype from Pteropus alecto which is most closely related to Bat coronavirus HKU9 identified in other pteropodid bats in China, Kenya and the Philippines. We also detected possible cross-species transmission of bat coronaviruses, and the apparent enteric tropism of these viruses. Thus, our findings are consistent with a scenario wherein the current diversity and host specificity of coronaviruses reflects co-evolution with the occasional host shift.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD, 4343, Australia. craig.smith@daf.qld.gov.au. Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Biosecurity Queensland, PO Box 156, Archerfield BC, Brisbane, QLD, 4108, Australia. craig.smith@daf.qld.gov.au.Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Biosecurity Queensland, PO Box 156, Archerfield BC, Brisbane, QLD, 4108, Australia.School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD, 4343, Australia.School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD, 4343, Australia.Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, 169857, Singapore.Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Biosecurity Queensland, PO Box 156, Archerfield BC, Brisbane, QLD, 4108, Australia. EcoHealth Alliance, New York, NY, 10001, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27048154

Citation

Smith, C S., et al. "Coronavirus Infection and Diversity in Bats in the Australasian Region." EcoHealth, vol. 13, no. 1, 2016, pp. 72-82.
Smith CS, de Jong CE, Meers J, et al. Coronavirus Infection and Diversity in Bats in the Australasian Region. Ecohealth. 2016;13(1):72-82.
Smith, C. S., de Jong, C. E., Meers, J., Henning, J., Wang, L., & Field, H. E. (2016). Coronavirus Infection and Diversity in Bats in the Australasian Region. EcoHealth, 13(1), 72-82. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10393-016-1116-x
Smith CS, et al. Coronavirus Infection and Diversity in Bats in the Australasian Region. Ecohealth. 2016;13(1):72-82. PubMed PMID: 27048154.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coronavirus Infection and Diversity in Bats in the Australasian Region. AU - Smith,C S, AU - de Jong,C E, AU - Meers,J, AU - Henning,J, AU - Wang,L- F, AU - Field,H E, Y1 - 2016/04/05/ PY - 2015/10/14/received PY - 2016/03/06/accepted PY - 2016/02/01/revised PY - 2016/4/7/entrez PY - 2016/4/7/pubmed PY - 2017/1/12/medline KW - Asia KW - Australia KW - SARS KW - bat KW - coronavirus KW - diversity SP - 72 EP - 82 JF - EcoHealth JO - Ecohealth VL - 13 IS - 1 N2 - Following the SARS outbreak, extensive surveillance was undertaken globally to detect and identify coronavirus diversity in bats. This study sought to identify the diversity and prevalence of coronaviruses in bats in the Australasian region. We identified four different genotypes of coronavirus, three of which (an alphacoronavirus and two betacoronaviruses) are potentially new species, having less than 90% nucleotide sequence identity with the most closely related described viruses. We did not detect any SARS-like betacoronaviruses, despite targeting rhinolophid bats, the putative natural host taxa. Our findings support the virus-host co-evolution hypothesis, with the detection of Miniopterus bat coronavirus HKU8 (previously reported in Miniopterus species in China, Hong Kong and Bulgaria) in Australian Miniopterus species. Similarly, we detected a novel betacoronavirus genotype from Pteropus alecto which is most closely related to Bat coronavirus HKU9 identified in other pteropodid bats in China, Kenya and the Philippines. We also detected possible cross-species transmission of bat coronaviruses, and the apparent enteric tropism of these viruses. Thus, our findings are consistent with a scenario wherein the current diversity and host specificity of coronaviruses reflects co-evolution with the occasional host shift. SN - 1612-9210 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27048154/Coronavirus_Infection_and_Diversity_in_Bats_in_the_Australasian_Region_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10393-016-1116-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -