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Accuracy of Prediction Formulae for the Assessment of Resting Energy Expenditure in Hospitalized Children.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2016; 63(6):708-712JP

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

The resting energy expenditure (REE) of ill children is commonly estimated from prediction formulae developed in healthy children. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of commonly employed REE prediction formulae versus indirect calorimetry in hospitalized children.

METHODS

We performed a cross-sectional study of 236 infants, children, and adolescents consecutively admitted to the Intermediate Care, Nephrology, Intensive Care, Emergency, and Cystic Fibrosis Units of the De Marchi Pediatric Hospital (Milan, Italy) between September 2013 and March 2015. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry and estimated using the World Health Organization (WHO), Harris-Benedict, Schofield, and Oxford formulae.

RESULTS

The mean (standard deviation) difference between the estimated and measured REE was: -1 (234) kcal/day for the WHO formula; 82 (286) kcal/day for the Harris-Benedict formula; 2 (215) kcal/day for the Schofield-weight formula; -2 (214) kcal/day for the Schofield-weight and height formula; and -5 (221) kcal/day for the Oxford formula. Even though the WHO, Schofield, and Oxford formulae gave accurate estimates of REE at the population level (small mean bias), all the formulae were not accurate enough to be employed at the individual level (large SD of bias).

CONCLUSIONS

The WHO, Harris-Benedict, Schofield, and Oxford formulae should not be used to estimate REE in hospitalized children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

*Pediatric Medium Intensity Care Unit, Department of Clinical Science and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico †Pediatric Nephrology and Dialysis Unit ‡Pediatric Intensive Care Unit §Pediatric Emergency Unit ||Cystic Fibrosis Center, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda-Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, University of Milan ¶International Center for the Assessment of Nutritional Status, University of Milan #Laboratorio di Statistica Medica, Biometria ed Epidemiologia 'G.A. Maccacaro' Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Validation Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27050053

Citation

Agostoni, Carlo, et al. "Accuracy of Prediction Formulae for the Assessment of Resting Energy Expenditure in Hospitalized Children." Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol. 63, no. 6, 2016, pp. 708-712.
Agostoni C, Edefonti A, Calderini E, et al. Accuracy of Prediction Formulae for the Assessment of Resting Energy Expenditure in Hospitalized Children. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2016;63(6):708-712.
Agostoni, C., Edefonti, A., Calderini, E., Fossali, E., Colombo, C., Battezzati, A., ... Bedogni, G. (2016). Accuracy of Prediction Formulae for the Assessment of Resting Energy Expenditure in Hospitalized Children. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 63(6), pp. 708-712.
Agostoni C, et al. Accuracy of Prediction Formulae for the Assessment of Resting Energy Expenditure in Hospitalized Children. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2016;63(6):708-712. PubMed PMID: 27050053.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Accuracy of Prediction Formulae for the Assessment of Resting Energy Expenditure in Hospitalized Children. AU - Agostoni,Carlo, AU - Edefonti,Alberto, AU - Calderini,Edoardo, AU - Fossali,Emilio, AU - Colombo,Carla, AU - Battezzati,Alberto, AU - Bertoli,Simona, AU - Milani,Gregorio, AU - Bisogno,Arianna, AU - Perrone,Michela, AU - Bettocchi,Silvia, AU - De Cosmi,Valentina, AU - Mazzocchi,Alessandra, AU - Bedogni,Giorgio, PY - 2016/4/7/pubmed PY - 2017/12/27/medline PY - 2016/4/7/entrez SP - 708 EP - 712 JF - Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition JO - J. Pediatr. Gastroenterol. Nutr. VL - 63 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: The resting energy expenditure (REE) of ill children is commonly estimated from prediction formulae developed in healthy children. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of commonly employed REE prediction formulae versus indirect calorimetry in hospitalized children. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of 236 infants, children, and adolescents consecutively admitted to the Intermediate Care, Nephrology, Intensive Care, Emergency, and Cystic Fibrosis Units of the De Marchi Pediatric Hospital (Milan, Italy) between September 2013 and March 2015. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry and estimated using the World Health Organization (WHO), Harris-Benedict, Schofield, and Oxford formulae. RESULTS: The mean (standard deviation) difference between the estimated and measured REE was: -1 (234) kcal/day for the WHO formula; 82 (286) kcal/day for the Harris-Benedict formula; 2 (215) kcal/day for the Schofield-weight formula; -2 (214) kcal/day for the Schofield-weight and height formula; and -5 (221) kcal/day for the Oxford formula. Even though the WHO, Schofield, and Oxford formulae gave accurate estimates of REE at the population level (small mean bias), all the formulae were not accurate enough to be employed at the individual level (large SD of bias). CONCLUSIONS: The WHO, Harris-Benedict, Schofield, and Oxford formulae should not be used to estimate REE in hospitalized children. SN - 1536-4801 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27050053/Accuracy_of_Prediction_Formulae_for_the_Assessment_of_Resting_Energy_Expenditure_in_Hospitalized_Children_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0000000000001223 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -