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Age at Introduction to Solid Foods and Child Obesity at 6 Years.
Child Obes. 2016 Jun; 12(3):188-92.CO

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Epidemiological evidence suggests that timing of introduction of solid foods may be associated with subsequent obesity, and the association may vary by whether an infant is breastfed or formula-fed.

METHODS

We included 1181 infants who participated in the Infant Feeding Practices Study II (IFPS II) and the Year 6 Follow Up (Y6FU) study. Data from IFPS II were used to calculate the primary exposure and timing of solid food introduction (<4, 4-<6, and ≥6 months), and data from Y6FU were used to calculate the primary outcome and obesity at 6 years of age (BMI ≥95th percentile). We used multivariable logistic regression to assess the association between timing of the introduction of solids and obesity at 6 years and test whether this association was modified by breastfeeding duration (breastfed for 4 months vs. not).

RESULTS

Prevalence of obesity in our sample was 12.0%. The odds of obesity was higher among infants introduced to solids <4 months compared to those introduced at 4-<6 months (odds ratio [OR] = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.15, 2.40) in unadjusted analysis; however, this relationship was no longer significant after adjustment for covariates (OR = 1.18; 95% CI, 0.79, 1.77). Introduction of solids ≥6 months was not associated with obesity. We found no interaction between breastfeeding duration and early solid food introduction and subsequent obesity.

CONCLUSIONS

Timing of introduction of solid foods was not associated with child obesity at 6 years in this sample. Given the inconsistency in findings with other studies, further studies in larger populations may be needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , Atlanta, GA.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , Atlanta, GA.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , Atlanta, GA.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , Atlanta, GA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27058343

Citation

Barrera, Chloe M., et al. "Age at Introduction to Solid Foods and Child Obesity at 6 Years." Childhood Obesity (Print), vol. 12, no. 3, 2016, pp. 188-92.
Barrera CM, Perrine CG, Li R, et al. Age at Introduction to Solid Foods and Child Obesity at 6 Years. Child Obes. 2016;12(3):188-92.
Barrera, C. M., Perrine, C. G., Li, R., & Scanlon, K. S. (2016). Age at Introduction to Solid Foods and Child Obesity at 6 Years. Childhood Obesity (Print), 12(3), 188-92. https://doi.org/10.1089/chi.2016.0021
Barrera CM, et al. Age at Introduction to Solid Foods and Child Obesity at 6 Years. Child Obes. 2016;12(3):188-92. PubMed PMID: 27058343.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Age at Introduction to Solid Foods and Child Obesity at 6 Years. AU - Barrera,Chloe M, AU - Perrine,Cria G, AU - Li,Ruowei, AU - Scanlon,Kelley S, Y1 - 2016/04/08/ PY - 2016/4/9/entrez PY - 2016/4/9/pubmed PY - 2017/6/1/medline SP - 188 EP - 92 JF - Childhood obesity (Print) JO - Child Obes VL - 12 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Epidemiological evidence suggests that timing of introduction of solid foods may be associated with subsequent obesity, and the association may vary by whether an infant is breastfed or formula-fed. METHODS: We included 1181 infants who participated in the Infant Feeding Practices Study II (IFPS II) and the Year 6 Follow Up (Y6FU) study. Data from IFPS II were used to calculate the primary exposure and timing of solid food introduction (<4, 4-<6, and ≥6 months), and data from Y6FU were used to calculate the primary outcome and obesity at 6 years of age (BMI ≥95th percentile). We used multivariable logistic regression to assess the association between timing of the introduction of solids and obesity at 6 years and test whether this association was modified by breastfeeding duration (breastfed for 4 months vs. not). RESULTS: Prevalence of obesity in our sample was 12.0%. The odds of obesity was higher among infants introduced to solids <4 months compared to those introduced at 4-<6 months (odds ratio [OR] = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.15, 2.40) in unadjusted analysis; however, this relationship was no longer significant after adjustment for covariates (OR = 1.18; 95% CI, 0.79, 1.77). Introduction of solids ≥6 months was not associated with obesity. We found no interaction between breastfeeding duration and early solid food introduction and subsequent obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Timing of introduction of solid foods was not associated with child obesity at 6 years in this sample. Given the inconsistency in findings with other studies, further studies in larger populations may be needed. SN - 2153-2176 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27058343/Age_at_Introduction_to_Solid_Foods_and_Child_Obesity_at_6_Years_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/chi.2016.0021?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -