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Impact and Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccine in Armenian Children.
Clin Infect Dis. 2016 May 01; 62 Suppl 2:S147-54.CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The Republic of Armenia was 1 of the 2 earliest countries in the Newly Independent States to introduce rotavirus vaccine into its national immunization program to reduce the burden of rotavirus disease (documented to cause 38% of acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations [AGE] among children aged <5 years). In November 2012, RV1 (Rotarix) was introduced for Armenian infants at ages 6 and 12 weeks.

METHODS

The established active surveillance system at 2 hospitals in the capital, Yerevan, whereby children aged <5 years hospitalized for AGE have stool sample tested for rotavirus antigen, was used to assess trends in rotavirus hospitalizations. Immunization records on children enrolled after vaccine introduction were obtained from clinics, and vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated using children with AGE who test negative for rotavirus as controls for the rotavirus-positive cases.

RESULTS

Among infants, rotavirus hospitalizations were reduced by 48% within the first year after introduction, and by ≥75% in years 2 and 3 following introduction. Reductions of ≥30% in other young children too old to have been vaccinated suggest additional benefit through indirect protection; overall in year 3, rotavirus hospitalizations were reduced by 69% among children aged <5 years. The overall VE of 2 RV1 doses in protecting against rotavirus hospitalization (any severity) was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 36%-77%) among children aged 6-23 months; 68% (95% CI, 24%-86%) among those aged 6-11 months, and 60% (95% CI, 20%-80%) in children aged 12-23 months. Against more severe rotavirus disease, VE was 79% (95% CI, 55%-90%) and similarly high in both age groups.

CONCLUSIONS

RV1 is effective in young Armenian children and substantially reduced rotavirus hospitalizations shortly after introduction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Immunization Program National Centre of Disease Control and Prevention Ministry of Health of the Republic of Armenia.National Centre of Disease Control and Prevention Ministry of Health of the Republic of Armenia Immunization and Epidemiology of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, Yerevan, Armenia.Vaccine-Preventable Diseases and Immunization, World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe, Copenhagen, Denmark.Vaccine-Preventable Diseases and Immunization, World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe, Copenhagen, Denmark.National Centre of Disease Control and Prevention Ministry of Health of the Republic of Armenia.Nork Infection Hospital, Country Office of Armenia, Yerevan.Nork Infection Hospital, Country Office of Armenia, Yerevan.Arabkir Medical Centre, Country Office of Armenia, Yerevan.World Health Organization, Country Office of Armenia, Yerevan.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.National Centre of Disease Control and Prevention Ministry of Health of the Republic of Armenia.Ministry of Health of the Republic of Armenia.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27059349

Citation

Sahakyan, Gayane, et al. "Impact and Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccine in Armenian Children." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 62 Suppl 2, 2016, pp. S147-54.
Sahakyan G, Grigoryan S, Wasley A, et al. Impact and Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccine in Armenian Children. Clin Infect Dis. 2016;62 Suppl 2:S147-54.
Sahakyan, G., Grigoryan, S., Wasley, A., Mosina, L., Sargsyan, S., Asoyan, A., Gevorgyan, Z., Kocharyan, K., Avagyan, T., Lopman, B., Vanyan, A., Khactatryan, S., Parashar, U. D., & Cortese, M. M. (2016). Impact and Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccine in Armenian Children. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 62 Suppl 2, S147-54. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciw045
Sahakyan G, et al. Impact and Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccine in Armenian Children. Clin Infect Dis. 2016 May 1;62 Suppl 2:S147-54. PubMed PMID: 27059349.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact and Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccine in Armenian Children. AU - Sahakyan,Gayane, AU - Grigoryan,Svetlana, AU - Wasley,Annemarie, AU - Mosina,Liudmila, AU - Sargsyan,Shushan, AU - Asoyan,Ara, AU - Gevorgyan,Zaruhi, AU - Kocharyan,Karine, AU - Avagyan,Tigran, AU - Lopman,Benjamin, AU - Vanyan,Artavazd, AU - Khactatryan,Sergey, AU - Parashar,Umesh D, AU - Cortese,Margaret M, PY - 2016/4/10/entrez PY - 2016/4/10/pubmed PY - 2016/12/29/medline KW - Armenia KW - effectiveness KW - impact KW - rotavirus vaccine SP - S147 EP - 54 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 62 Suppl 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The Republic of Armenia was 1 of the 2 earliest countries in the Newly Independent States to introduce rotavirus vaccine into its national immunization program to reduce the burden of rotavirus disease (documented to cause 38% of acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations [AGE] among children aged <5 years). In November 2012, RV1 (Rotarix) was introduced for Armenian infants at ages 6 and 12 weeks. METHODS: The established active surveillance system at 2 hospitals in the capital, Yerevan, whereby children aged <5 years hospitalized for AGE have stool sample tested for rotavirus antigen, was used to assess trends in rotavirus hospitalizations. Immunization records on children enrolled after vaccine introduction were obtained from clinics, and vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated using children with AGE who test negative for rotavirus as controls for the rotavirus-positive cases. RESULTS: Among infants, rotavirus hospitalizations were reduced by 48% within the first year after introduction, and by ≥75% in years 2 and 3 following introduction. Reductions of ≥30% in other young children too old to have been vaccinated suggest additional benefit through indirect protection; overall in year 3, rotavirus hospitalizations were reduced by 69% among children aged <5 years. The overall VE of 2 RV1 doses in protecting against rotavirus hospitalization (any severity) was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 36%-77%) among children aged 6-23 months; 68% (95% CI, 24%-86%) among those aged 6-11 months, and 60% (95% CI, 20%-80%) in children aged 12-23 months. Against more severe rotavirus disease, VE was 79% (95% CI, 55%-90%) and similarly high in both age groups. CONCLUSIONS: RV1 is effective in young Armenian children and substantially reduced rotavirus hospitalizations shortly after introduction. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27059349/Impact_and_Effectiveness_of_Monovalent_Rotavirus_Vaccine_in_Armenian_Children_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cid/ciw045 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -