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Point-of-sale promotion of breastmilk substitutes and commercially produced complementary foods in Cambodia, Nepal, Senegal and Tanzania.
Matern Child Nutr 2016; 12 Suppl 2:126-39MC

Abstract

In order to assess the prevalence of point-of-sale promotions of infant and young child feeding products in Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Kathmandu Valley, Nepal; Dakar Department, Senegal; and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, approximately 30 retail stores per site, 121 in total, were visited. Promotional activity for breastmilk substitutes (BMS) and commercially produced complementary foods in each site were recorded. Point-of-sale promotion of BMS occurred in approximately one-third of sampled stores in Phnom Penh and Dakar Department but in 3.2% and 6.7% of stores in Kathmandu Valley and Dar es Salaam, respectively. Promotion of commercially produced complementary foods was highly prevalent in Dakar Department with half of stores having at least one promotion, while promotions for these products occurred in 10% or less of stores in the other three sites. While promotion of BMS in stores is legal in Senegal, it is prohibited in Cambodia without prior permission of the Ministry of Health/Ministry of Information and prohibited in both Nepal and Tanzania. Strengthening legislation in Senegal and enforcing regulations in Cambodia could help to prevent such promotion that can negatively affect breastfeeding practices.

KEY MESSAGES

Even in countries such as Cambodia, Nepal and Tanzania where point-of-sale promotion is restricted, promotions of BMS were observed (in nearly one-third of stores in Phnom Penh and less than 10% in Dar es Salaam and Kathmandu). Limited promotion of commercially produced complementary foods was evident (less than 10% of stores had a promotion for such foods), except in Dakar Department, where promotions were found in half of stores. Efforts are needed to strengthen monitoring, regulation and enforcement of restrictions on the promotion of BMS. Manufacturers and distributors should take responsibility for compliance with national regulations and global policies pertaining to the promotion of breastmilk substitutes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Helen Keller International, Washington, DC., USA.JB Consultancy, Bryanston, South Africa.JB Consultancy, Bryanston, South Africa.Helen Keller International, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.Helen Keller International, Dakar, Senegal.Helen Keller International, Dakar, Senegal.Helen Keller International, Kathmandu, Nepal.Consultant to Helen Keller International.Helen Keller International, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.Helen Keller International, Washington, DC., USA.Consultant to Helen Keller International.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27061961

Citation

Champeny, Mary, et al. "Point-of-sale Promotion of Breastmilk Substitutes and Commercially Produced Complementary Foods in Cambodia, Nepal, Senegal and Tanzania." Maternal & Child Nutrition, vol. 12 Suppl 2, 2016, pp. 126-39.
Champeny M, Pereira C, Sweet L, et al. Point-of-sale promotion of breastmilk substitutes and commercially produced complementary foods in Cambodia, Nepal, Senegal and Tanzania. Matern Child Nutr. 2016;12 Suppl 2:126-39.
Champeny, M., Pereira, C., Sweet, L., Khin, M., Ndiaye Coly, A., Sy Gueye, N. Y., ... Huffman, S. L. (2016). Point-of-sale promotion of breastmilk substitutes and commercially produced complementary foods in Cambodia, Nepal, Senegal and Tanzania. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 12 Suppl 2, pp. 126-39. doi:10.1111/mcn.12272.
Champeny M, et al. Point-of-sale Promotion of Breastmilk Substitutes and Commercially Produced Complementary Foods in Cambodia, Nepal, Senegal and Tanzania. Matern Child Nutr. 2016;12 Suppl 2:126-39. PubMed PMID: 27061961.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Point-of-sale promotion of breastmilk substitutes and commercially produced complementary foods in Cambodia, Nepal, Senegal and Tanzania. AU - Champeny,Mary, AU - Pereira,Catherine, AU - Sweet,Lara, AU - Khin,Mengkheang, AU - Ndiaye Coly,Aminata, AU - Sy Gueye,Ndeye Yaga, AU - Adhikary,Indu, AU - Dhungel,Shrid, AU - Makafu,Cecilia, AU - Zehner,Elizabeth, AU - Huffman,Sandra L, PY - 2016/4/11/entrez PY - 2016/4/12/pubmed PY - 2017/1/4/medline SP - 126 EP - 39 JF - Maternal & child nutrition JO - Matern Child Nutr VL - 12 Suppl 2 N2 - UNLABELLED: In order to assess the prevalence of point-of-sale promotions of infant and young child feeding products in Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Kathmandu Valley, Nepal; Dakar Department, Senegal; and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, approximately 30 retail stores per site, 121 in total, were visited. Promotional activity for breastmilk substitutes (BMS) and commercially produced complementary foods in each site were recorded. Point-of-sale promotion of BMS occurred in approximately one-third of sampled stores in Phnom Penh and Dakar Department but in 3.2% and 6.7% of stores in Kathmandu Valley and Dar es Salaam, respectively. Promotion of commercially produced complementary foods was highly prevalent in Dakar Department with half of stores having at least one promotion, while promotions for these products occurred in 10% or less of stores in the other three sites. While promotion of BMS in stores is legal in Senegal, it is prohibited in Cambodia without prior permission of the Ministry of Health/Ministry of Information and prohibited in both Nepal and Tanzania. Strengthening legislation in Senegal and enforcing regulations in Cambodia could help to prevent such promotion that can negatively affect breastfeeding practices. KEY MESSAGES: Even in countries such as Cambodia, Nepal and Tanzania where point-of-sale promotion is restricted, promotions of BMS were observed (in nearly one-third of stores in Phnom Penh and less than 10% in Dar es Salaam and Kathmandu). Limited promotion of commercially produced complementary foods was evident (less than 10% of stores had a promotion for such foods), except in Dakar Department, where promotions were found in half of stores. Efforts are needed to strengthen monitoring, regulation and enforcement of restrictions on the promotion of BMS. Manufacturers and distributors should take responsibility for compliance with national regulations and global policies pertaining to the promotion of breastmilk substitutes. SN - 1740-8709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27061961/Point_of_sale_promotion_of_breastmilk_substitutes_and_commercially_produced_complementary_foods_in_Cambodia_Nepal_Senegal_and_Tanzania_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12272 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -