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Giftedness. Can it be predicted in infancy?
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1989 May; 28(5):205-9.CPed

Abstract

A cohort of 200 children, who were followed from birth and periodically evaluated as part of a longitudinal study of child development, was used to determine the ability of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID) to predict children who would be considered intellectually gifted at 7.5 years. The cohort was predominantly white (91%), upper middle class (70% in Hollingshead class 1 or 2), and had preschool educational experiences (94%). At outcome, 36 children had WISC-R verbal, performance, or full scale IQs greater than 135 and were called gifted. On average, gifted children walked 0.7 months earlier and spoke two-word sentences 2.2 months earlier than the non-gifted group. As a group, gifted children showed statistically significant, but clinically small, advantages for age of walking, age of speaking two-word sentences, BSID, and Stanford Binet IQ. Of the 36 children who later proved to be gifted, only two had BSID IQs greater than 134. Of the four children who had BSID IQs greater than 134, two maintained their superior function but 2 did not. A discriminant function analysis was used to predict giftedness for individual children based on BSID performance. The resulting classification achieved sensitivity = 0.69 and specificity = 0.39. Although groups of infants who will be gifted have higher BSID scores, the BSID cannot be endorsed as a method of identifying individual infants who will later demonstrate superior cognitive function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Johns Hopkins University Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2706881

Citation

Shapiro, B K., et al. "Giftedness. Can It Be Predicted in Infancy?" Clinical Pediatrics, vol. 28, no. 5, 1989, pp. 205-9.
Shapiro BK, Palmer FB, Antell SE, et al. Giftedness. Can it be predicted in infancy? Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1989;28(5):205-9.
Shapiro, B. K., Palmer, F. B., Antell, S. E., Bilker, S., Ross, A., & Capute, A. J. (1989). Giftedness. Can it be predicted in infancy? Clinical Pediatrics, 28(5), 205-9.
Shapiro BK, et al. Giftedness. Can It Be Predicted in Infancy. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1989;28(5):205-9. PubMed PMID: 2706881.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Giftedness. Can it be predicted in infancy? AU - Shapiro,B K, AU - Palmer,F B, AU - Antell,S E, AU - Bilker,S, AU - Ross,A, AU - Capute,A J, PY - 1989/5/1/pubmed PY - 1989/5/1/medline PY - 1989/5/1/entrez SP - 205 EP - 9 JF - Clinical pediatrics JO - Clin Pediatr (Phila) VL - 28 IS - 5 N2 - A cohort of 200 children, who were followed from birth and periodically evaluated as part of a longitudinal study of child development, was used to determine the ability of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID) to predict children who would be considered intellectually gifted at 7.5 years. The cohort was predominantly white (91%), upper middle class (70% in Hollingshead class 1 or 2), and had preschool educational experiences (94%). At outcome, 36 children had WISC-R verbal, performance, or full scale IQs greater than 135 and were called gifted. On average, gifted children walked 0.7 months earlier and spoke two-word sentences 2.2 months earlier than the non-gifted group. As a group, gifted children showed statistically significant, but clinically small, advantages for age of walking, age of speaking two-word sentences, BSID, and Stanford Binet IQ. Of the 36 children who later proved to be gifted, only two had BSID IQs greater than 134. Of the four children who had BSID IQs greater than 134, two maintained their superior function but 2 did not. A discriminant function analysis was used to predict giftedness for individual children based on BSID performance. The resulting classification achieved sensitivity = 0.69 and specificity = 0.39. Although groups of infants who will be gifted have higher BSID scores, the BSID cannot be endorsed as a method of identifying individual infants who will later demonstrate superior cognitive function. SN - 0009-9228 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2706881/Giftedness__Can_it_be_predicted_in_infancy L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/000992288902800501?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -