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Metabolic Syndrome and Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Relation to Muscle Mass.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This study aimed to evaluate the association between decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) according to muscle mass.

METHODS

Body composition was measured in 3351 men and 4394 women aged between 19 and 97 years using the 2010-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and low and high muscle mass. Groups were identified using the mean sex-specific appendicular muscle mass/height2. eGFR was computed using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation; MetS was defined by the Harmonized definition and International Diabetes Federation criteria.

RESULTS

When stratified by muscle mass and adjusted for covariates, MetS was not associated with decreased eGFR in men with high muscle mass, but was associated in men with low muscle mass (odds ratio 3.19-3.87). MetS was associated with decreased eGFR in women with high (odds ratio 2.41-2.68) and low (odds ratio 2.45-2.55) muscle mass. Men with MetS and low muscle mass, women with MetS and high muscle mass, and women with MetS and low muscle mass had 2.95-3.21, 2.23-2.59, and 2.75-2.76 times higher odds for decreased eGFR, respectively, compared with their MetS-free and high muscle mass counterparts, after adjusting for covariates. The odds ratio was not significant for men with high muscle mass and MetS.

CONCLUSIONS

MetS was associated with decreased eGFR in women, regardless of muscle mass, and in men with low muscle mass. High muscle mass in men may attenuate the association.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Department of Family Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine , Busan, South Korea .

    Source

    MeSH

    Absorptiometry, Photon
    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Body Composition
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Female
    Glomerular Filtration Rate
    Humans
    Male
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Middle Aged
    Muscle, Skeletal
    Nutrition Surveys
    Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
    Republic of Korea
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27077710

    Citation

    Lee, Kayoung. "Metabolic Syndrome and Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Relation to Muscle Mass." Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, vol. 14, no. 8, 2016, pp. 404-409.
    Lee K. Metabolic Syndrome and Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Relation to Muscle Mass. Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2016;14(8):404-409.
    Lee, K. (2016). Metabolic Syndrome and Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Relation to Muscle Mass. Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, 14(8), pp. 404-409.
    Lee K. Metabolic Syndrome and Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Relation to Muscle Mass. Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2016;14(8):404-409. PubMed PMID: 27077710.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic Syndrome and Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Relation to Muscle Mass. A1 - Lee,Kayoung, Y1 - 2016/04/14/ PY - 2016/4/15/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline PY - 2016/4/15/entrez KW - body composition KW - kidney function KW - metabolic syndrome SP - 404 EP - 409 JF - Metabolic syndrome and related disorders JO - Metab Syndr Relat Disord VL - 14 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate the association between decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) according to muscle mass. METHODS: Body composition was measured in 3351 men and 4394 women aged between 19 and 97 years using the 2010-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and low and high muscle mass. Groups were identified using the mean sex-specific appendicular muscle mass/height2. eGFR was computed using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation; MetS was defined by the Harmonized definition and International Diabetes Federation criteria. RESULTS: When stratified by muscle mass and adjusted for covariates, MetS was not associated with decreased eGFR in men with high muscle mass, but was associated in men with low muscle mass (odds ratio 3.19-3.87). MetS was associated with decreased eGFR in women with high (odds ratio 2.41-2.68) and low (odds ratio 2.45-2.55) muscle mass. Men with MetS and low muscle mass, women with MetS and high muscle mass, and women with MetS and low muscle mass had 2.95-3.21, 2.23-2.59, and 2.75-2.76 times higher odds for decreased eGFR, respectively, compared with their MetS-free and high muscle mass counterparts, after adjusting for covariates. The odds ratio was not significant for men with high muscle mass and MetS. CONCLUSIONS: MetS was associated with decreased eGFR in women, regardless of muscle mass, and in men with low muscle mass. High muscle mass in men may attenuate the association. SN - 1557-8518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27077710/Metabolic_Syndrome_and_Decreased_Estimated_Glomerular_Filtration_Rate_in_Relation_to_Muscle_Mass_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/met.2016.0017?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -