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Acculturation, psychological adjustment, and parenting styles of Chinese immigrant mothers in the United States.
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2016 10; 22(4):504-516.CD

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study examined whether acculturation to American culture, maintenance of Chinese culture, and their interaction predicted Chinese immigrant parents' psychological adjustment and parenting styles. We hypothesized that American orientation would be associated with more positive psychological well-being and fewer depressive symptoms in immigrant mothers, which in turn would be associated with more authoritative parenting and less authoritarian parenting. The examination of the roles of Chinese orientation and the interaction of the 2 cultural orientations in relation to psychological adjustment and parenting were exploratory.

METHOD

Participants were 164 first-generation Chinese immigrant mothers in the United States (Mage = 37.80). Structural equation modeling was used to examine the direct and indirect effects of acculturation on psychological adjustment and parenting. Bootstrapping technique was used to explore the conditional indirect effects of acculturation on parenting as appropriate.

RESULTS

American orientation was strongly associated with positive psychological well-being, which was in turn related to more authoritative parenting and less authoritarian parenting. Moreover, American and Chinese orientations interacted to predict depressive symptoms, which were in turn associated with more authoritarian parenting. Specifically, American orientation was negatively associated with depressive symptoms only at mean or high levels of Chinese orientation.

CONCLUSIONS

Results suggest acculturation as a distal contextual factor and psychological adjustment as 1 critical mechanism that transmits effects of acculturation to parenting. Promoting immigrant parents' ability and comfort in the new culture independently or in conjunction with encouraging biculturalism through policy intervention efforts appear crucial for the positive adjustment of Chinese immigrant parents and children. (PsycINFO Database Record

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County.Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County.Kenney Krieger Institute, John Hopkins Hospital.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27077796

Citation

Yu, Jing, et al. "Acculturation, Psychological Adjustment, and Parenting Styles of Chinese Immigrant Mothers in the United States." Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, vol. 22, no. 4, 2016, pp. 504-516.
Yu J, Cheah CS, Calvin G. Acculturation, psychological adjustment, and parenting styles of Chinese immigrant mothers in the United States. Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2016;22(4):504-516.
Yu, J., Cheah, C. S., & Calvin, G. (2016). Acculturation, psychological adjustment, and parenting styles of Chinese immigrant mothers in the United States. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, 22(4), 504-516.
Yu J, Cheah CS, Calvin G. Acculturation, Psychological Adjustment, and Parenting Styles of Chinese Immigrant Mothers in the United States. Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2016;22(4):504-516. PubMed PMID: 27077796.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acculturation, psychological adjustment, and parenting styles of Chinese immigrant mothers in the United States. AU - Yu,Jing, AU - Cheah,Charissa S L, AU - Calvin,Grace, Y1 - 2016/04/14/ PY - 2016/4/15/pubmed PY - 2018/1/24/medline PY - 2016/4/15/entrez SP - 504 EP - 516 JF - Cultural diversity & ethnic minority psychology JO - Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol VL - 22 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether acculturation to American culture, maintenance of Chinese culture, and their interaction predicted Chinese immigrant parents' psychological adjustment and parenting styles. We hypothesized that American orientation would be associated with more positive psychological well-being and fewer depressive symptoms in immigrant mothers, which in turn would be associated with more authoritative parenting and less authoritarian parenting. The examination of the roles of Chinese orientation and the interaction of the 2 cultural orientations in relation to psychological adjustment and parenting were exploratory. METHOD: Participants were 164 first-generation Chinese immigrant mothers in the United States (Mage = 37.80). Structural equation modeling was used to examine the direct and indirect effects of acculturation on psychological adjustment and parenting. Bootstrapping technique was used to explore the conditional indirect effects of acculturation on parenting as appropriate. RESULTS: American orientation was strongly associated with positive psychological well-being, which was in turn related to more authoritative parenting and less authoritarian parenting. Moreover, American and Chinese orientations interacted to predict depressive symptoms, which were in turn associated with more authoritarian parenting. Specifically, American orientation was negatively associated with depressive symptoms only at mean or high levels of Chinese orientation. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest acculturation as a distal contextual factor and psychological adjustment as 1 critical mechanism that transmits effects of acculturation to parenting. Promoting immigrant parents' ability and comfort in the new culture independently or in conjunction with encouraging biculturalism through policy intervention efforts appear crucial for the positive adjustment of Chinese immigrant parents and children. (PsycINFO Database Record SN - 1099-9809 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27077796/Acculturation_psychological_adjustment_and_parenting_styles_of_Chinese_immigrant_mothers_in_the_United_States_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/cdp/22/4/504 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -