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Whole-grain dietary recommendations: the need for a unified global approach.
Br J Nutr. 2016 06; 115(11):2031-8.BJ

Abstract

Increased whole-grain (WG) consumption reduces the risk of CVD, type 2 diabetes and some cancers, is related to reduced body weight and weight gain and is related to improved intestinal health. Definitions of 'WG' and 'WG food' are proposed and used in some countries but are not consistent. Many countries promote WG consumption, but the emphasis given and the messages used vary. We surveyed dietary recommendations of fifty-three countries for mentions of WG to assess the extent, rationale and diversity in emphasis and wording of any recommendations. If present, recommendations were classified as either 'primary', where the recommendation was specific for WG, or 'secondary', where recommendations were made in order to achieve another (primary) target, most often dietary fibre intake. In total, 127 organisations were screened, including government, non-governmental organisations, charities and professional bodies, the WHO and European Food Safety Authority, of which forty-nine including WHO provide a WG intake recommendation. Recommendations ranged from 'specific' with specified target amounts (e.g. x g WG/d), 'semi-quantitative' where intake was linked to intake of cereal/carbohydrate foods with proportions of WG suggested (e.g. x servings of cereals of which y servings should be WG) to 'non-specific' based on 'eating more' WG or 'choosing WG where possible'. This lack of a harmonised message may result in confusion for the consumer, lessen the impact of public health messages and pose barriers to trade in the food industry. A science-based consensus or expert opinion on WG recommendations is needed, with a global reach to guide public health decision making and increase WG consumption globally.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1School of Agriculture,Food & Rural Development,Human Nutrition Research Centre,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon Tyne,NE1 7RU,UK.2UCD Institute of Food and Health,UCD,Belfield,Dublin 4,Ireland.3TES Nutrihealth Strategic Consultancy,46 Jalan SS22/32,47400 Petaling Jaya,Selangor D.E.,Malaysia.4Thielecke Consultancy,Bettenstrasse 60a,4123 Allschwill,Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27082494

Citation

Seal, Chris J., et al. "Whole-grain Dietary Recommendations: the Need for a Unified Global Approach." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 115, no. 11, 2016, pp. 2031-8.
Seal CJ, Nugent AP, Tee ES, et al. Whole-grain dietary recommendations: the need for a unified global approach. Br J Nutr. 2016;115(11):2031-8.
Seal, C. J., Nugent, A. P., Tee, E. S., & Thielecke, F. (2016). Whole-grain dietary recommendations: the need for a unified global approach. The British Journal of Nutrition, 115(11), 2031-8. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114516001161
Seal CJ, et al. Whole-grain Dietary Recommendations: the Need for a Unified Global Approach. Br J Nutr. 2016;115(11):2031-8. PubMed PMID: 27082494.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Whole-grain dietary recommendations: the need for a unified global approach. AU - Seal,Chris J, AU - Nugent,Anne P, AU - Tee,E-Siong, AU - Thielecke,Frank, Y1 - 2016/04/15/ PY - 2016/4/16/entrez PY - 2016/4/16/pubmed PY - 2017/5/4/medline KW - Dietary recommendations KW - EFSA European Food Safety Authority KW - FBDG food-based dietary guidelines KW - Global recommendations KW - Whole grain KW - Whole-grain intakes SP - 2031 EP - 8 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 115 IS - 11 N2 - Increased whole-grain (WG) consumption reduces the risk of CVD, type 2 diabetes and some cancers, is related to reduced body weight and weight gain and is related to improved intestinal health. Definitions of 'WG' and 'WG food' are proposed and used in some countries but are not consistent. Many countries promote WG consumption, but the emphasis given and the messages used vary. We surveyed dietary recommendations of fifty-three countries for mentions of WG to assess the extent, rationale and diversity in emphasis and wording of any recommendations. If present, recommendations were classified as either 'primary', where the recommendation was specific for WG, or 'secondary', where recommendations were made in order to achieve another (primary) target, most often dietary fibre intake. In total, 127 organisations were screened, including government, non-governmental organisations, charities and professional bodies, the WHO and European Food Safety Authority, of which forty-nine including WHO provide a WG intake recommendation. Recommendations ranged from 'specific' with specified target amounts (e.g. x g WG/d), 'semi-quantitative' where intake was linked to intake of cereal/carbohydrate foods with proportions of WG suggested (e.g. x servings of cereals of which y servings should be WG) to 'non-specific' based on 'eating more' WG or 'choosing WG where possible'. This lack of a harmonised message may result in confusion for the consumer, lessen the impact of public health messages and pose barriers to trade in the food industry. A science-based consensus or expert opinion on WG recommendations is needed, with a global reach to guide public health decision making and increase WG consumption globally. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27082494/Whole_grain_dietary_recommendations:_the_need_for_a_unified_global_approach_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114516001161/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -