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[The Salernitan School of Medicine: Its History and Contribution to European Medical Education].
Nihon Ishigaku Zasshi. 2015 Dec; 61(4):393-407.NI

Abstract

The Salernitan School of Medicine was founded in the late 10th century as a loose association of medical teachers. The period before the middle 13th century was divided into three phases. In the early phase, before the end of 11th century, "practica" books were written, utilizing extant ancient literature, Arabic medical treatises were translated into Latin, and the medical text "Articella" was compiled. In the high phase before the end of the 12th century, the "Articella" was commented upon and new pharmacopeia and practica books were written. In the late phase before the middle of the 13th century, physicians who graduated from Salerno were active in various countries in Europe. After the middle of the 13th century the school developed organizations and rules, became a university at the end of 16th century, and was closed in 1811. The Salernitan school produced "Articella", which pioneered in theoretical medical education, and produced "practica", which dealt with both local diseases from head to foot and systemic fever diseases, and it continued until the end of 18th century. The two major disciplines of medical education before the end of 18th century, theoretica and practica, were derived from Salerno.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review

Language

jpn

PubMed ID

27089736

Citation

Sakai, Tatsuo. "[The Salernitan School of Medicine: Its History and Contribution to European Medical Education]." Nihon Ishigaku Zasshi. [Journal of Japanese History of Medicine], vol. 61, no. 4, 2015, pp. 393-407.
Sakai T. [The Salernitan School of Medicine: Its History and Contribution to European Medical Education]. Nihon Ishigaku Zasshi. 2015;61(4):393-407.
Sakai, T. (2015). [The Salernitan School of Medicine: Its History and Contribution to European Medical Education]. Nihon Ishigaku Zasshi. [Journal of Japanese History of Medicine], 61(4), 393-407.
Sakai T. [The Salernitan School of Medicine: Its History and Contribution to European Medical Education]. Nihon Ishigaku Zasshi. 2015;61(4):393-407. PubMed PMID: 27089736.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [The Salernitan School of Medicine: Its History and Contribution to European Medical Education]. A1 - Sakai,Tatsuo, PY - 2016/4/20/entrez PY - 2016/4/20/pubmed PY - 2016/5/6/medline SP - 393 EP - 407 JF - Nihon ishigaku zasshi. [Journal of Japanese history of medicine] JO - Nihon Ishigaku Zasshi VL - 61 IS - 4 N2 - The Salernitan School of Medicine was founded in the late 10th century as a loose association of medical teachers. The period before the middle 13th century was divided into three phases. In the early phase, before the end of 11th century, "practica" books were written, utilizing extant ancient literature, Arabic medical treatises were translated into Latin, and the medical text "Articella" was compiled. In the high phase before the end of the 12th century, the "Articella" was commented upon and new pharmacopeia and practica books were written. In the late phase before the middle of the 13th century, physicians who graduated from Salerno were active in various countries in Europe. After the middle of the 13th century the school developed organizations and rules, became a university at the end of 16th century, and was closed in 1811. The Salernitan school produced "Articella", which pioneered in theoretical medical education, and produced "practica", which dealt with both local diseases from head to foot and systemic fever diseases, and it continued until the end of 18th century. The two major disciplines of medical education before the end of 18th century, theoretica and practica, were derived from Salerno. SN - 0549-3323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27089736/[The_Salernitan_School_of_Medicine:_Its_History_and_Contribution_to_European_Medical_Education]_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -