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Association between dietary inflammatory potential and breast cancer incidence and death: results from the Women's Health Initiative.
Br J Cancer 2016; 114(11):1277-85BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Diet modulates inflammation and inflammatory markers have been associated with cancer outcomes. In the Women's Health Initiative, we investigated associations between a dietary inflammatory index (DII) and invasive breast cancer incidence and death.

METHODS

The DII was calculated from a baseline food frequency questionnaire in 122 788 postmenopausal women, enrolled from 1993 to 1998 with no prior cancer, and followed until 29 August 2014. With median follow-up of 16.02 years, there were 7495 breast cancer cases and 667 breast cancer deaths. We used Cox regression to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazards ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) by DII quintiles (Q) for incidence of overall breast cancer, breast cancer subtypes, and deaths from breast cancer. The lowest quintile (representing the most anti-inflammatory diet) was the reference.

RESULTS

The DII was not associated with incidence of overall breast cancer (HRQ5vsQ1, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.91-1.07; Ptrend=0.83 for overall breast cancer). In a full cohort analysis, a higher risk of death from breast cancer was associated with consumption of more pro-inflammatory diets at baseline, after controlling for multiple potential confounders (HRQ5vsQ1, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.01-1.76; Ptrend=0.03).

CONCLUSIONS

Future studies are needed to examine the inflammatory potential of post-diagnosis diet given the suggestion from the current study that dietary inflammatory potential before diagnosis is related to breast cancer death.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. Center for Research in Nutrition and Health Disparities, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. Center for Research in Nutrition and Health Disparities, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, Oakland, CA, USA.Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LABioMed), Torrance, CA, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA.Department of Preventive Medicine and the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.Department of Epidemiology & Prevention, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA.Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27100730

Citation

Tabung, Fred K., et al. "Association Between Dietary Inflammatory Potential and Breast Cancer Incidence and Death: Results From the Women's Health Initiative." British Journal of Cancer, vol. 114, no. 11, 2016, pp. 1277-85.
Tabung FK, Steck SE, Liese AD, et al. Association between dietary inflammatory potential and breast cancer incidence and death: results from the Women's Health Initiative. Br J Cancer. 2016;114(11):1277-85.
Tabung, F. K., Steck, S. E., Liese, A. D., Zhang, J., Ma, Y., Caan, B., ... Hébert, J. R. (2016). Association between dietary inflammatory potential and breast cancer incidence and death: results from the Women's Health Initiative. British Journal of Cancer, 114(11), pp. 1277-85. doi:10.1038/bjc.2016.98.
Tabung FK, et al. Association Between Dietary Inflammatory Potential and Breast Cancer Incidence and Death: Results From the Women's Health Initiative. Br J Cancer. 2016 05 24;114(11):1277-85. PubMed PMID: 27100730.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between dietary inflammatory potential and breast cancer incidence and death: results from the Women's Health Initiative. AU - Tabung,Fred K, AU - Steck,Susan E, AU - Liese,Angela D, AU - Zhang,Jiajia, AU - Ma,Yunsheng, AU - Caan,Bette, AU - Chlebowski,Rowan T, AU - Freudenheim,Jo L, AU - Hou,Lifang, AU - Mossavar-Rahmani,Yasmin, AU - Shivappa,Nitin, AU - Vitolins,Mara Z, AU - Wactawski-Wende,Jean, AU - Ockene,Judith K, AU - Hébert,James R, Y1 - 2016/04/21/ PY - 2015/12/07/received PY - 2016/03/02/revised PY - 2016/03/13/accepted PY - 2016/4/22/entrez PY - 2016/4/22/pubmed PY - 2017/5/16/medline SP - 1277 EP - 85 JF - British journal of cancer JO - Br. J. Cancer VL - 114 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Diet modulates inflammation and inflammatory markers have been associated with cancer outcomes. In the Women's Health Initiative, we investigated associations between a dietary inflammatory index (DII) and invasive breast cancer incidence and death. METHODS: The DII was calculated from a baseline food frequency questionnaire in 122 788 postmenopausal women, enrolled from 1993 to 1998 with no prior cancer, and followed until 29 August 2014. With median follow-up of 16.02 years, there were 7495 breast cancer cases and 667 breast cancer deaths. We used Cox regression to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazards ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) by DII quintiles (Q) for incidence of overall breast cancer, breast cancer subtypes, and deaths from breast cancer. The lowest quintile (representing the most anti-inflammatory diet) was the reference. RESULTS: The DII was not associated with incidence of overall breast cancer (HRQ5vsQ1, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.91-1.07; Ptrend=0.83 for overall breast cancer). In a full cohort analysis, a higher risk of death from breast cancer was associated with consumption of more pro-inflammatory diets at baseline, after controlling for multiple potential confounders (HRQ5vsQ1, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.01-1.76; Ptrend=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Future studies are needed to examine the inflammatory potential of post-diagnosis diet given the suggestion from the current study that dietary inflammatory potential before diagnosis is related to breast cancer death. SN - 1532-1827 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27100730/Association_between_dietary_inflammatory_potential_and_breast_cancer_incidence_and_death:_results_from_the_Women's_Health_Initiative_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2016.98 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -