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Functional independence in resting-state connectivity facilitates higher-order cognition.
Brain Cogn 2016; 105:78-87BC

Abstract

Growing evidence suggests that intrinsic functional connectivity (i.e. highly structured patterns of communication between brain regions during wakeful rest) may encode cognitive ability. However, the generalizability of these findings is limited by between-study differences in statistical methodology and cognitive domains evaluated. To address this barrier, we evaluated resting-state neural representations of multiple cognitive domains within a relatively large normative adult sample. Forty-four participants (mean(sd) age=31(10) years; 18 male and 26 female) completed a resting-state functional MRI scan and neuropsychological assessments spanning motor, visuospatial, language, learning, memory, attention, working memory, and executive function performance. Robust linear regression related cognitive performance to resting-state connectivity among 200 a priori determined functional regions of interest (ROIs). Only higher-order cognitions (such as learning and executive function) demonstrated significant relationships between brain function and behavior. Additionally, all significant relationships were negative - characterized by moderately positive correlations among low performers and weak to moderately negative correlations among high performers. These findings suggest that functional independence among brain regions at rest facilitates cognitive performance. Our interpretation is consistent with graph theoretic analyses which represent the brain as independent functional nodes that undergo dynamic reorganization with task demand. Future work will build upon these findings by evaluating domain-specific variance in resting-state neural representations of cognitive impairment among patient populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Psychiatric Research Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, United States. Electronic address: GAJames@uams.edu.Psychiatric Research Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, United States.Psychiatric Research Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, United States.Psychiatric Research Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, United States.Psychiatric Research Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, United States.Psychiatric Research Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27105037

Citation

James, G Andrew, et al. "Functional Independence in Resting-state Connectivity Facilitates Higher-order Cognition." Brain and Cognition, vol. 105, 2016, pp. 78-87.
James GA, Kearney-Ramos TE, Young JA, et al. Functional independence in resting-state connectivity facilitates higher-order cognition. Brain Cogn. 2016;105:78-87.
James, G. A., Kearney-Ramos, T. E., Young, J. A., Kilts, C. D., Gess, J. L., & Fausett, J. S. (2016). Functional independence in resting-state connectivity facilitates higher-order cognition. Brain and Cognition, 105, pp. 78-87. doi:10.1016/j.bandc.2016.03.008.
James GA, et al. Functional Independence in Resting-state Connectivity Facilitates Higher-order Cognition. Brain Cogn. 2016;105:78-87. PubMed PMID: 27105037.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Functional independence in resting-state connectivity facilitates higher-order cognition. AU - James,G Andrew, AU - Kearney-Ramos,Tonisha E, AU - Young,Jonathan A, AU - Kilts,Clinton D, AU - Gess,Jennifer L, AU - Fausett,Jennifer S, Y1 - 2016/04/20/ PY - 2015/10/26/received PY - 2016/03/23/revised PY - 2016/03/25/accepted PY - 2016/4/23/entrez PY - 2016/4/23/pubmed PY - 2017/7/1/medline KW - Attention KW - Connectome KW - Executive functioning KW - Individual differences KW - Memory KW - fMRI SP - 78 EP - 87 JF - Brain and cognition JO - Brain Cogn VL - 105 N2 - Growing evidence suggests that intrinsic functional connectivity (i.e. highly structured patterns of communication between brain regions during wakeful rest) may encode cognitive ability. However, the generalizability of these findings is limited by between-study differences in statistical methodology and cognitive domains evaluated. To address this barrier, we evaluated resting-state neural representations of multiple cognitive domains within a relatively large normative adult sample. Forty-four participants (mean(sd) age=31(10) years; 18 male and 26 female) completed a resting-state functional MRI scan and neuropsychological assessments spanning motor, visuospatial, language, learning, memory, attention, working memory, and executive function performance. Robust linear regression related cognitive performance to resting-state connectivity among 200 a priori determined functional regions of interest (ROIs). Only higher-order cognitions (such as learning and executive function) demonstrated significant relationships between brain function and behavior. Additionally, all significant relationships were negative - characterized by moderately positive correlations among low performers and weak to moderately negative correlations among high performers. These findings suggest that functional independence among brain regions at rest facilitates cognitive performance. Our interpretation is consistent with graph theoretic analyses which represent the brain as independent functional nodes that undergo dynamic reorganization with task demand. Future work will build upon these findings by evaluating domain-specific variance in resting-state neural representations of cognitive impairment among patient populations. SN - 1090-2147 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27105037/Functional_independence_in_resting_state_connectivity_facilitates_higher_order_cognition_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-2626(16)30024-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -