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Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus in Sami and Norwegian populations. The SAMINOR-a cross-sectional study.
BMJ Open. 2016 Apr 22; 6(4):e009474.BO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is recognised as a reliable long-term predictor of adverse health outcomes. Elevated prevalence rates of MetS and chronic lifestyle diseases have been documented in different indigenous groups. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of MetS and diabetes mellitus in relation to ethnicity in Northern Norway. In addition, we discussed different cut-off values for waist circumference (WC) and what impact this has on the prevalence of MetS.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

SAMINOR is a population-based study of health and living conditions in areas home to Sami and non-Sami populations. The survey was carried out in 2003-2004. All eligible residents in specific age groups were invited. In total, 16,538 males and females aged 36-79 years participated and gave informed consent for medical research.

RESULTS

This study involved a total of 7822 female and 7290 male participants. Sami affiliation was reported by 5141 participants (34%). The prevalence of MetS was high in both ethnic groups independent of which WC cut-off value was used. No ethnic differences in prevalence of diabetes mellitus were demonstrated. However, ethnicity appeared to affect diabetes treatment, which was more prevalent among Sami than non-Sami women.

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, there was no ethnic difference in diabetes prevalence, but ethnicity appeared to affect diabetes treatment. Tablet treatment was more commonly in use among Sami women than among non-Sami women. We demonstrated a high share of negative metabolic components. These metabolic components have important health implications. Therefore, determining preventive initiatives is important in the primary and specialist healthcare system. These initiatives must be made culture and linguistic specific, in order to reduce differences and improve health status in the whole population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Sami Health Research, University of Tromsø-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway Medical Department, University Hospital of North Norway, Harstad, Norway.Centre for Sami Health Research, University of Tromsø-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27105711

Citation

Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild, and Marita Melhus. "Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Mellitus in Sami and Norwegian Populations. the SAMINOR-a Cross-sectional Study." BMJ Open, vol. 6, no. 4, 2016, pp. e009474.
Broderstad AR, Melhus M. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus in Sami and Norwegian populations. The SAMINOR-a cross-sectional study. BMJ Open. 2016;6(4):e009474.
Broderstad, A. R., & Melhus, M. (2016). Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus in Sami and Norwegian populations. The SAMINOR-a cross-sectional study. BMJ Open, 6(4), e009474. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009474
Broderstad AR, Melhus M. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Mellitus in Sami and Norwegian Populations. the SAMINOR-a Cross-sectional Study. BMJ Open. 2016 Apr 22;6(4):e009474. PubMed PMID: 27105711.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus in Sami and Norwegian populations. The SAMINOR-a cross-sectional study. AU - Broderstad,Ann Ragnhild, AU - Melhus,Marita, Y1 - 2016/04/22/ PY - 2016/4/24/entrez PY - 2016/4/24/pubmed PY - 2016/12/31/medline KW - EPIDEMIOLOGY SP - e009474 EP - e009474 JF - BMJ open JO - BMJ Open VL - 6 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is recognised as a reliable long-term predictor of adverse health outcomes. Elevated prevalence rates of MetS and chronic lifestyle diseases have been documented in different indigenous groups. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of MetS and diabetes mellitus in relation to ethnicity in Northern Norway. In addition, we discussed different cut-off values for waist circumference (WC) and what impact this has on the prevalence of MetS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: SAMINOR is a population-based study of health and living conditions in areas home to Sami and non-Sami populations. The survey was carried out in 2003-2004. All eligible residents in specific age groups were invited. In total, 16,538 males and females aged 36-79 years participated and gave informed consent for medical research. RESULTS: This study involved a total of 7822 female and 7290 male participants. Sami affiliation was reported by 5141 participants (34%). The prevalence of MetS was high in both ethnic groups independent of which WC cut-off value was used. No ethnic differences in prevalence of diabetes mellitus were demonstrated. However, ethnicity appeared to affect diabetes treatment, which was more prevalent among Sami than non-Sami women. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, there was no ethnic difference in diabetes prevalence, but ethnicity appeared to affect diabetes treatment. Tablet treatment was more commonly in use among Sami women than among non-Sami women. We demonstrated a high share of negative metabolic components. These metabolic components have important health implications. Therefore, determining preventive initiatives is important in the primary and specialist healthcare system. These initiatives must be made culture and linguistic specific, in order to reduce differences and improve health status in the whole population. SN - 2044-6055 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27105711/Prevalence_of_metabolic_syndrome_and_diabetes_mellitus_in_Sami_and_Norwegian_populations__The_SAMINOR_a_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - https://bmjopen.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=27105711 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -