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Nutrition and risk of dementia: overview and methodological issues.
Ann N Y Acad Sci 2016; 1367(1):31-7AN

Abstract

After two decades of research on nutrition and dementia there is strong evidence for preventive effects of vitamin E, B vitamins, and n-3 fatty acids and deleterious effects of saturated fat on dementia. Among specific foods with evidence of neuroprotection are green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, berries, and seafood. A number of studies have examined dietary patterns, particularly the Mediterranean diet and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), neither of which is tailored to the specific foods and nutrients that have been identified as neuroprotective. A new diet called MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay) incorporates many elements of the Mediterranean diet and DASH but with modifications that reflect current evidence for brain neuroprotection. The evidence in support of the relation of various nutrients and the Mediterranean diet to dementia has been inconsistent. The inconsistencies may be explained by inattention to nutrient/food intake levels in the interpretation of study findings and trial design, including a shifting metric among studies for scoring adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Future studies should pay particular attention to levels of intake in the design and analyses of nutritional studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Nutrition and Nutritional Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27116239

Citation

Morris, Martha Clare. "Nutrition and Risk of Dementia: Overview and Methodological Issues." Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1367, no. 1, 2016, pp. 31-7.
Morris MC. Nutrition and risk of dementia: overview and methodological issues. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2016;1367(1):31-7.
Morris, M. C. (2016). Nutrition and risk of dementia: overview and methodological issues. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1367(1), pp. 31-7. doi:10.1111/nyas.13047.
Morris MC. Nutrition and Risk of Dementia: Overview and Methodological Issues. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2016;1367(1):31-7. PubMed PMID: 27116239.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrition and risk of dementia: overview and methodological issues. A1 - Morris,Martha Clare, PY - 2015/11/10/received PY - 2016/02/22/revised PY - 2016/02/25/accepted PY - 2017/03/01/pmc-release PY - 2016/4/27/entrez PY - 2016/4/27/pubmed PY - 2017/7/15/medline KW - Alzheimer's disease KW - cognitive decline KW - dementia KW - diet patterns SP - 31 EP - 7 JF - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences JO - Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. VL - 1367 IS - 1 N2 - After two decades of research on nutrition and dementia there is strong evidence for preventive effects of vitamin E, B vitamins, and n-3 fatty acids and deleterious effects of saturated fat on dementia. Among specific foods with evidence of neuroprotection are green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, berries, and seafood. A number of studies have examined dietary patterns, particularly the Mediterranean diet and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), neither of which is tailored to the specific foods and nutrients that have been identified as neuroprotective. A new diet called MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay) incorporates many elements of the Mediterranean diet and DASH but with modifications that reflect current evidence for brain neuroprotection. The evidence in support of the relation of various nutrients and the Mediterranean diet to dementia has been inconsistent. The inconsistencies may be explained by inattention to nutrient/food intake levels in the interpretation of study findings and trial design, including a shifting metric among studies for scoring adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Future studies should pay particular attention to levels of intake in the design and analyses of nutritional studies. SN - 1749-6632 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27116239/Nutrition_and_risk_of_dementia:_overview_and_methodological_issues_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.13047 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -