Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Socio-economic differences in HIV/AIDS mortality in South Africa.
Trop Med Int Health. 2016 07; 21(7):846-55.TM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To quantify socio-economic differences in the risk of HIV/AIDS mortality in South Africa for different measures of socio-economic status.

METHODS

Systematic literature search in Web of Knowledge and PubMed. Measures of relative risk (RR) were pooled separately for education, income, assets score and employment status as measures of socio-economic status, using inverse-variance weighted DerSimonian-Laird random effects meta-analyses.

RESULTS

Ten studies were eligible for inclusion comprising over 175 000 participants and 6700 deaths. For income (RR 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-2.09), assets score (RR 1.63, 95% CI 1.12-2.36) and employment status (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.21-1.92), persons of low socio-economic status had an over 50% higher risk of dying from HIV/AIDS. The RR of 1.10 for education was not significant (95% CI 0.74-1.65).

CONCLUSIONS

Future research should identify effective strategies to reduce HIV/AIDS mortality and alleviate the consequences of HIV/AIDS deaths, particularly for poorer households.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy & Center of Clinical Epidemiology and Longitudinal Studies, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.Alcohol, Tobacco & Other Drug Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa. Department of Psychiatry, University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa.Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy & Center of Clinical Epidemiology and Longitudinal Studies, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany. Addiction Policy, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27118253

Citation

Probst, Charlotte, et al. "Socio-economic Differences in HIV/AIDS Mortality in South Africa." Tropical Medicine & International Health : TM & IH, vol. 21, no. 7, 2016, pp. 846-55.
Probst C, Parry CD, Rehm J. Socio-economic differences in HIV/AIDS mortality in South Africa. Trop Med Int Health. 2016;21(7):846-55.
Probst, C., Parry, C. D., & Rehm, J. (2016). Socio-economic differences in HIV/AIDS mortality in South Africa. Tropical Medicine & International Health : TM & IH, 21(7), 846-55. https://doi.org/10.1111/tmi.12712
Probst C, Parry CD, Rehm J. Socio-economic Differences in HIV/AIDS Mortality in South Africa. Trop Med Int Health. 2016;21(7):846-55. PubMed PMID: 27118253.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Socio-economic differences in HIV/AIDS mortality in South Africa. AU - Probst,Charlotte, AU - Parry,Charles D H, AU - Rehm,Jürgen, Y1 - 2016/05/18/ PY - 2016/4/28/entrez PY - 2016/4/28/pubmed PY - 2017/6/27/medline KW - AIDS KW - Afrique du Sud KW - HIV KW - SIDA KW - South Africa KW - Sudáfrica KW - VIH KW - desigualdad KW - estatus socioeconómico KW - inequality KW - inégalité KW - mortalidad KW - mortality KW - mortalité KW - socio-economic status KW - statut socioéconomique SP - 846 EP - 55 JF - Tropical medicine & international health : TM & IH JO - Trop. Med. Int. Health VL - 21 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To quantify socio-economic differences in the risk of HIV/AIDS mortality in South Africa for different measures of socio-economic status. METHODS: Systematic literature search in Web of Knowledge and PubMed. Measures of relative risk (RR) were pooled separately for education, income, assets score and employment status as measures of socio-economic status, using inverse-variance weighted DerSimonian-Laird random effects meta-analyses. RESULTS: Ten studies were eligible for inclusion comprising over 175 000 participants and 6700 deaths. For income (RR 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-2.09), assets score (RR 1.63, 95% CI 1.12-2.36) and employment status (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.21-1.92), persons of low socio-economic status had an over 50% higher risk of dying from HIV/AIDS. The RR of 1.10 for education was not significant (95% CI 0.74-1.65). CONCLUSIONS: Future research should identify effective strategies to reduce HIV/AIDS mortality and alleviate the consequences of HIV/AIDS deaths, particularly for poorer households. SN - 1365-3156 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27118253/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/tmi.12712 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -