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Children's perceptions of emotion regulation strategy effectiveness: links with attachment security.
Attach Hum Dev. 2016 08; 18(4):354-72.AH

Abstract

Six- and nine-year-old children (N = 97) heard illustrated stories evoking anger in a story character and provided evaluations of the effectiveness of eight anger regulation strategies. Half the stories involved the child's mother as social partner and the other half involved a peer. Attachment security was assessed via the Security Scale. Children reported greater effectiveness for seeking support from adults and peers in the peer context than the mother context, but perceived venting as more effective with mothers. Children with higher security scores were more likely to endorse problem solving and less likely to endorse aggression in both social contexts than those with lower security scores. Early evidence for gender differences was found in that boys endorsed the effectiveness of distraction while girls endorsed venting their emotion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Human Development , Washington State University, Vancouver , Vancouver , WA , USA.b Department of Psychology , University of California , Davis , CA , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27121493

Citation

Waters, Sara F., and Ross A. Thompson. "Children's Perceptions of Emotion Regulation Strategy Effectiveness: Links With Attachment Security." Attachment & Human Development, vol. 18, no. 4, 2016, pp. 354-72.
Waters SF, Thompson RA. Children's perceptions of emotion regulation strategy effectiveness: links with attachment security. Attach Hum Dev. 2016;18(4):354-72.
Waters, S. F., & Thompson, R. A. (2016). Children's perceptions of emotion regulation strategy effectiveness: links with attachment security. Attachment & Human Development, 18(4), 354-72. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616734.2016.1170051
Waters SF, Thompson RA. Children's Perceptions of Emotion Regulation Strategy Effectiveness: Links With Attachment Security. Attach Hum Dev. 2016;18(4):354-72. PubMed PMID: 27121493.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Children's perceptions of emotion regulation strategy effectiveness: links with attachment security. AU - Waters,Sara F, AU - Thompson,Ross A, Y1 - 2016/04/28/ PY - 2016/4/29/entrez PY - 2016/4/29/pubmed PY - 2017/11/2/medline KW - Emotion regulation KW - attachment security KW - middle childhood KW - social context SP - 354 EP - 72 JF - Attachment & human development JO - Attach Hum Dev VL - 18 IS - 4 N2 - Six- and nine-year-old children (N = 97) heard illustrated stories evoking anger in a story character and provided evaluations of the effectiveness of eight anger regulation strategies. Half the stories involved the child's mother as social partner and the other half involved a peer. Attachment security was assessed via the Security Scale. Children reported greater effectiveness for seeking support from adults and peers in the peer context than the mother context, but perceived venting as more effective with mothers. Children with higher security scores were more likely to endorse problem solving and less likely to endorse aggression in both social contexts than those with lower security scores. Early evidence for gender differences was found in that boys endorsed the effectiveness of distraction while girls endorsed venting their emotion. SN - 1469-2988 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27121493/Children's_perceptions_of_emotion_regulation_strategy_effectiveness:_links_with_attachment_security_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14616734.2016.1170051 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -