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Noxious heat threshold temperature and pronociceptive effects of allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil) in TRPV1 or TRPA1 gene-deleted mice.
Life Sci. 2016 Jun 01; 154:66-74.LS

Abstract

AIMS

To investigate the roles of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels in baseline and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-evoked nociceptive responses by comparing wild-type and gene-deficient mice.

MAIN METHODS

In contrast to conventional methods of thermonociception measuring reflex latencies, we used our novel methods to determine the noxious heat threshold.

KEY FINDINGS

It was revealed that the heat threshold of the tail measured by an increasing-temperature water bath is significantly higher in TRPV1(-/-), but not TRPA1(-/-), mice compared to respective wild-types. There was no difference between the noxious heat thresholds of the hind paw as measured by an increasing-temperature hot plate in TRPV1(-/-), TRPA1(-/-) and the corresponding wild-type mice. The withdrawal latency of the tail from 0°C water was prolonged in TRPA1(-/-), but not TRPV1(-/-), mice compared to respective wild-types. In wild-type animals, dipping the tail or paw into 1% AITC induced an 8-14°C drop of the noxious heat threshold (heat allodynia) of both the tail and paw, and 40-50% drop of the mechanonociceptive threshold (mechanical allodynia) of the paw measured by dynamic plantar esthesiometry. These AITC-evoked responses were diminished in TRPV1(-/-), but not TRPA1(-/-), mice. Tail withdrawal latency to 1% AITC was significantly prolonged in both gene-deleted strains.

SIGNIFICANCE

Different heat sensors determine the noxious heat threshold in distinct areas: a pivotal role for TRPV1 on the tail is contrasted with no involvement of either TRPV1 or TRPA1 on the hind paw. Noxious heat threshold measurement appears appropriate for preclinical screening of TRP channel ligands as novel analgesics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology and Pharemacotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, Szigeti u. 12, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary; János Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 34, H-7634 Pécs, Hungary.Department of Pharmacology and Pharemacotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, Szigeti u. 12, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary; János Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 34, H-7634 Pécs, Hungary.Department of Pharmacology and Pharemacotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, Szigeti u. 12, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary; János Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 34, H-7634 Pécs, Hungary.Department of Pharmacology and Pharemacotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, Szigeti u. 12, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary; János Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 34, H-7634 Pécs, Hungary.Department of Pharmacology and Pharemacotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, Szigeti u. 12, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary; János Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 34, H-7634 Pécs, Hungary.Department of Pharmacology and Pharemacotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, Szigeti u. 12, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary; János Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 34, H-7634 Pécs, Hungary.Department of Pharmacology and Pharemacotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, Szigeti u. 12, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary; PharmInVivo Ltd., Szondi György u. 10, H-7629 Pécs, Hungary.Department of Pharmacology and Pharemacotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, Szigeti u. 12, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary; MTA-PTE NAP B Pain Research Group & Center for Neuroscience, University of Pécs Medical School, Szigeti u. 12, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary; János Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 34, H-7634 Pécs, Hungary; PharmInVivo Ltd., Szondi György u. 10, H-7629 Pécs, Hungary.Department of Pharmacology and Pharemacotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, Szigeti u. 12, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary. Electronic address: gabor.petho@aok.pte.hu.Department of Pharmacology and Pharemacotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, Szigeti u. 12, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary; PharmInVivo Ltd., Szondi György u. 10, H-7629 Pécs, Hungary.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27126699

Citation

Tékus, Valéria, et al. "Noxious Heat Threshold Temperature and Pronociceptive Effects of Allyl Isothiocyanate (mustard Oil) in TRPV1 or TRPA1 Gene-deleted Mice." Life Sciences, vol. 154, 2016, pp. 66-74.
Tékus V, Horváth Á, Hajna Z, et al. Noxious heat threshold temperature and pronociceptive effects of allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil) in TRPV1 or TRPA1 gene-deleted mice. Life Sci. 2016;154:66-74.
Tékus, V., Horváth, Á., Hajna, Z., Borbély, É., Bölcskei, K., Boros, M., Pintér, E., Helyes, Z., Pethő, G., & Szolcsányi, J. (2016). Noxious heat threshold temperature and pronociceptive effects of allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil) in TRPV1 or TRPA1 gene-deleted mice. Life Sciences, 154, 66-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2016.04.030
Tékus V, et al. Noxious Heat Threshold Temperature and Pronociceptive Effects of Allyl Isothiocyanate (mustard Oil) in TRPV1 or TRPA1 Gene-deleted Mice. Life Sci. 2016 Jun 1;154:66-74. PubMed PMID: 27126699.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Noxious heat threshold temperature and pronociceptive effects of allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil) in TRPV1 or TRPA1 gene-deleted mice. AU - Tékus,Valéria, AU - Horváth,Ádám, AU - Hajna,Zsófia, AU - Borbély,Éva, AU - Bölcskei,Kata, AU - Boros,Melinda, AU - Pintér,Erika, AU - Helyes,Zsuzsanna, AU - Pethő,Gábor, AU - Szolcsányi,János, Y1 - 2016/04/25/ PY - 2016/02/02/received PY - 2016/04/05/revised PY - 2016/04/23/accepted PY - 2016/4/30/entrez PY - 2016/4/30/pubmed PY - 2017/1/31/medline KW - Allodynia KW - Mustard oil KW - Noxious heat threshold KW - TRPA1 KW - TRPV1 SP - 66 EP - 74 JF - Life sciences JO - Life Sci VL - 154 N2 - AIMS: To investigate the roles of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels in baseline and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-evoked nociceptive responses by comparing wild-type and gene-deficient mice. MAIN METHODS: In contrast to conventional methods of thermonociception measuring reflex latencies, we used our novel methods to determine the noxious heat threshold. KEY FINDINGS: It was revealed that the heat threshold of the tail measured by an increasing-temperature water bath is significantly higher in TRPV1(-/-), but not TRPA1(-/-), mice compared to respective wild-types. There was no difference between the noxious heat thresholds of the hind paw as measured by an increasing-temperature hot plate in TRPV1(-/-), TRPA1(-/-) and the corresponding wild-type mice. The withdrawal latency of the tail from 0°C water was prolonged in TRPA1(-/-), but not TRPV1(-/-), mice compared to respective wild-types. In wild-type animals, dipping the tail or paw into 1% AITC induced an 8-14°C drop of the noxious heat threshold (heat allodynia) of both the tail and paw, and 40-50% drop of the mechanonociceptive threshold (mechanical allodynia) of the paw measured by dynamic plantar esthesiometry. These AITC-evoked responses were diminished in TRPV1(-/-), but not TRPA1(-/-), mice. Tail withdrawal latency to 1% AITC was significantly prolonged in both gene-deleted strains. SIGNIFICANCE: Different heat sensors determine the noxious heat threshold in distinct areas: a pivotal role for TRPV1 on the tail is contrasted with no involvement of either TRPV1 or TRPA1 on the hind paw. Noxious heat threshold measurement appears appropriate for preclinical screening of TRP channel ligands as novel analgesics. SN - 1879-0631 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27126699/Noxious_heat_threshold_temperature_and_pronociceptive_effects_of_allyl_isothiocyanate__mustard_oil__in_TRPV1_or_TRPA1_gene_deleted_mice_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -