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Oral contraceptives and breast cancer: latest findings in a large cohort study.

Abstract

During the interval 1968-74, 17,032 women aged 25-39 years were recruited to the Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study, more than half of whom were using oral contraceptives. These women have been followed up over the years and breast cancer has been diagnosed in 189 of them. We have analysed the available data in two ways. First, we have calculated standardised breast cancer incidence rates in non-users and users of oral contraceptives according to total duration of use, interval since first use, interval since last use, duration of use before first term pregnancy and duration of use before age 25. Secondly, we have conducted case-control within cohort analyses to examine the possible effects of different types of pill and to search for evidence of a latent effect of oral contraceptive use before first term pregnancy on breast cancer risk. We have found no evidence of any adverse effect of oral contraceptive use on the risk of breast cancer in this study. There was, however, little exposure to the pill before first term pregnancy among the participants and virtually no such exposure at a very young age (i.e. below 20 years). Accordingly, the results of this study strengthen the evidence that oral contraceptive use by mature women does not increase breast cancer risk, but add little to the uncertainty about the effects of early use.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK.

    , ,

    Source

    British journal of cancer 59:4 1989 Apr pg 613-7

    MeSH

    Adult
    Age Factors
    Breast Neoplasms
    Cohort Studies
    Contraceptives, Oral
    Female
    Humans
    Risk Factors
    Time Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    2713247

    Citation

    Vessey, M P., et al. "Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer: Latest Findings in a Large Cohort Study." British Journal of Cancer, vol. 59, no. 4, 1989, pp. 613-7.
    Vessey MP, McPherson K, Villard-Mackintosh L, et al. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer: latest findings in a large cohort study. Br J Cancer. 1989;59(4):613-7.
    Vessey, M. P., McPherson, K., Villard-Mackintosh, L., & Yeates, D. (1989). Oral contraceptives and breast cancer: latest findings in a large cohort study. British Journal of Cancer, 59(4), pp. 613-7.
    Vessey MP, et al. Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer: Latest Findings in a Large Cohort Study. Br J Cancer. 1989;59(4):613-7. PubMed PMID: 2713247.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Oral contraceptives and breast cancer: latest findings in a large cohort study. AU - Vessey,M P, AU - McPherson,K, AU - Villard-Mackintosh,L, AU - Yeates,D, PY - 1989/4/1/pubmed PY - 1989/4/1/medline PY - 1989/4/1/entrez KW - Age Factors KW - Breast Cancer--etiology KW - Cancer KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Methods--side effects KW - Data Analysis KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Diseases KW - England--women KW - Europe KW - Family Planning KW - Neoplasms KW - Northern Europe KW - Oral Contraceptives--side effects KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Research Methodology KW - Scotland--women KW - United Kingdom SP - 613 EP - 7 JF - British journal of cancer JO - Br. J. Cancer VL - 59 IS - 4 N2 - During the interval 1968-74, 17,032 women aged 25-39 years were recruited to the Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study, more than half of whom were using oral contraceptives. These women have been followed up over the years and breast cancer has been diagnosed in 189 of them. We have analysed the available data in two ways. First, we have calculated standardised breast cancer incidence rates in non-users and users of oral contraceptives according to total duration of use, interval since first use, interval since last use, duration of use before first term pregnancy and duration of use before age 25. Secondly, we have conducted case-control within cohort analyses to examine the possible effects of different types of pill and to search for evidence of a latent effect of oral contraceptive use before first term pregnancy on breast cancer risk. We have found no evidence of any adverse effect of oral contraceptive use on the risk of breast cancer in this study. There was, however, little exposure to the pill before first term pregnancy among the participants and virtually no such exposure at a very young age (i.e. below 20 years). Accordingly, the results of this study strengthen the evidence that oral contraceptive use by mature women does not increase breast cancer risk, but add little to the uncertainty about the effects of early use. SN - 0007-0920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2713247/Oral_contraceptives_and_breast_cancer:_latest_findings_in_a_large_cohort_study_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/2713247/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -