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Investigating nutrient profiling and Health Star Ratings on core dairy products in Australia.
Public Health Nutr. 2016 10; 19(15):2860-5.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether the ratings from the Australian front-of-pack labelling scheme, Health Star Rating (HSR), and the ability to carry health claims using the Nutrient Profiling Scoring Criterion (NPSC) for core dairy products promote foods consistent with the Australian Dietary Guidelines.

DESIGN

The Australian nutrient profiling model used for assessing eligibility for health claims was compared with the nutrient profiling model underpinning the HSR system to determine their agreement when assessing dairy products. Agreement between the extent to which products met nutrient profiling criteria and scored three stars or over using the HSR calculator was determined using Cohen's kappa tests.

SETTING

The four largest supermarket chains in Sydney, Australia.

SUBJECTS

All available products in the milk, hard cheese, soft cheese and yoghurt categories (n 1363) were surveyed in March-May 2014. Nutrition composition and ingredients lists were recorded for each product.

RESULTS

There was 'good' agreement between NPSC and HSR overall (κ=0·78; 95 % CI 0·75, 0·81; P<0·001), for hard cheeses (κ=0·72; 95 % CI 0·65, 0·79; P<0·001) and yoghurt (κ=0·79; 95 % CI 0·73, 0·86; P<0·001). There was 'fair' agreement for milk (κ=0·33; 95 % CI 0·20, 0·45; P<0·001) and 'very good' agreement for soft cheese (κ=0·84; 95 % CI 0·75, 0·92; P<0·001). Generally, products tended to have HSR consistent with other products of a similar type within their categories.

CONCLUSIONS

For dairy products, the HSR scheme largely aligned with the NPSC used for determining eligibility for health claims. Both systems appeared be consistent with the Australian Dietary Guidelines for dairy products, with lower-fat products rating higher.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Programs Division,Cancer Council NSW,153 Dowling Street,Woolloomooloo,NSW 2011,Australia.Cancer Programs Division,Cancer Council NSW,153 Dowling Street,Woolloomooloo,NSW 2011,Australia.Cancer Programs Division,Cancer Council NSW,153 Dowling Street,Woolloomooloo,NSW 2011,Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27133967

Citation

Wellard, Lyndal, et al. "Investigating Nutrient Profiling and Health Star Ratings On Core Dairy Products in Australia." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 19, no. 15, 2016, pp. 2860-5.
Wellard L, Hughes C, Watson WL. Investigating nutrient profiling and Health Star Ratings on core dairy products in Australia. Public Health Nutr. 2016;19(15):2860-5.
Wellard, L., Hughes, C., & Watson, W. L. (2016). Investigating nutrient profiling and Health Star Ratings on core dairy products in Australia. Public Health Nutrition, 19(15), 2860-5. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980016000975
Wellard L, Hughes C, Watson WL. Investigating Nutrient Profiling and Health Star Ratings On Core Dairy Products in Australia. Public Health Nutr. 2016;19(15):2860-5. PubMed PMID: 27133967.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Investigating nutrient profiling and Health Star Ratings on core dairy products in Australia. AU - Wellard,Lyndal, AU - Hughes,Clare, AU - Watson,Wendy L, Y1 - 2016/05/02/ PY - 2016/5/3/entrez PY - 2016/5/3/pubmed PY - 2018/4/5/medline KW - Dairy products Nutrient profiling KW - Food labelling KW - Food regulation SP - 2860 EP - 5 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 19 IS - 15 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the ratings from the Australian front-of-pack labelling scheme, Health Star Rating (HSR), and the ability to carry health claims using the Nutrient Profiling Scoring Criterion (NPSC) for core dairy products promote foods consistent with the Australian Dietary Guidelines. DESIGN: The Australian nutrient profiling model used for assessing eligibility for health claims was compared with the nutrient profiling model underpinning the HSR system to determine their agreement when assessing dairy products. Agreement between the extent to which products met nutrient profiling criteria and scored three stars or over using the HSR calculator was determined using Cohen's kappa tests. SETTING: The four largest supermarket chains in Sydney, Australia. SUBJECTS: All available products in the milk, hard cheese, soft cheese and yoghurt categories (n 1363) were surveyed in March-May 2014. Nutrition composition and ingredients lists were recorded for each product. RESULTS: There was 'good' agreement between NPSC and HSR overall (κ=0·78; 95 % CI 0·75, 0·81; P<0·001), for hard cheeses (κ=0·72; 95 % CI 0·65, 0·79; P<0·001) and yoghurt (κ=0·79; 95 % CI 0·73, 0·86; P<0·001). There was 'fair' agreement for milk (κ=0·33; 95 % CI 0·20, 0·45; P<0·001) and 'very good' agreement for soft cheese (κ=0·84; 95 % CI 0·75, 0·92; P<0·001). Generally, products tended to have HSR consistent with other products of a similar type within their categories. CONCLUSIONS: For dairy products, the HSR scheme largely aligned with the NPSC used for determining eligibility for health claims. Both systems appeared be consistent with the Australian Dietary Guidelines for dairy products, with lower-fat products rating higher. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27133967/Investigating_nutrient_profiling_and_Health_Star_Ratings_on_core_dairy_products_in_Australia_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980016000975/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -