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What public school teachers teach about preventing pregnancy, AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases.
Fam Plann Perspect. 1989 Mar-Apr; 21(2):65-72.FP

Abstract

Ninety-three percent of public school teachers in five specialties-biology, health education, home economics, physical education and school nursing--who teach grades 7-12 report that their schools offer sex education or AIDS education in some form. Almost all the teachers believe that a wide range of topics related to the prevention of pregnancy, AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) should be taught in the public schools, and most believe these topics should be covered by grades 7-8 at the latest. In practice, however, sex education tends not to occur until the ninth or 10th grades. Moreover, there is often a gap between what teachers think should be taught and what actually is taught. For example, virtually all the teachers say that school sex education should cover sexual decision-making, abstinence and birth control methods, but only 82-84 percent of the teachers are in schools that provide instruction in those topics. The largest gap occurs in connection with sources of birth control methods: Ninety-seven percent of teachers say that sex education classes should address where students can go to obtain a method, but only 48 percent are in schools where this is done. Forty-five percent of teachers in the five specialties currently provide sex education in some form. The messages they most want to give to their students are responsibility regarding sexual relationships and parenthood, the importance of abstinence and ways of resisting pressures to become sexually active, and information about AIDS and other STDs.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Alan Guttmacher Institute.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2714427

Citation

Forrest, J D., and J Silverman. "What Public School Teachers Teach About Preventing Pregnancy, AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases." Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 21, no. 2, 1989, pp. 65-72.
Forrest JD, Silverman J. What public school teachers teach about preventing pregnancy, AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. Fam Plann Perspect. 1989;21(2):65-72.
Forrest, J. D., & Silverman, J. (1989). What public school teachers teach about preventing pregnancy, AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. Family Planning Perspectives, 21(2), 65-72.
Forrest JD, Silverman J. What Public School Teachers Teach About Preventing Pregnancy, AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Fam Plann Perspect. 1989 Mar-Apr;21(2):65-72. PubMed PMID: 2714427.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - What public school teachers teach about preventing pregnancy, AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. AU - Forrest,J D, AU - Silverman,J, PY - 1989/3/1/pubmed PY - 1989/3/1/medline PY - 1989/3/1/entrez SP - 65 EP - 72 JF - Family planning perspectives JO - Fam Plann Perspect VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - Ninety-three percent of public school teachers in five specialties-biology, health education, home economics, physical education and school nursing--who teach grades 7-12 report that their schools offer sex education or AIDS education in some form. Almost all the teachers believe that a wide range of topics related to the prevention of pregnancy, AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) should be taught in the public schools, and most believe these topics should be covered by grades 7-8 at the latest. In practice, however, sex education tends not to occur until the ninth or 10th grades. Moreover, there is often a gap between what teachers think should be taught and what actually is taught. For example, virtually all the teachers say that school sex education should cover sexual decision-making, abstinence and birth control methods, but only 82-84 percent of the teachers are in schools that provide instruction in those topics. The largest gap occurs in connection with sources of birth control methods: Ninety-seven percent of teachers say that sex education classes should address where students can go to obtain a method, but only 48 percent are in schools where this is done. Forty-five percent of teachers in the five specialties currently provide sex education in some form. The messages they most want to give to their students are responsibility regarding sexual relationships and parenthood, the importance of abstinence and ways of resisting pressures to become sexually active, and information about AIDS and other STDs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0014-7354 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2714427/What_public_school_teachers_teach_about_preventing_pregnancy_AIDS_and_sexually_transmitted_diseases_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/279 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -